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eroshea

  • 3 years ago

how to graph this in the number line? (x^2 + 2)/(x^2+16)>0

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  1. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    this is a polynomial it will be on a coordinate plane

  2. eroshea
    • 3 years ago
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    but this is inequality ? so how?

  3. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry forgot how , and i dont want to give wrong answer

  4. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    do you know how to factor

  5. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    just factor the top polynomial and then the bottom see if you can cancel any thing out

  6. eroshea
    • 3 years ago
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    what i did was to factor both the numerator and the denominator i got an imaginary root/solution so how can i plot it in the number line..?? and 1 more thing, the denominator should not be equal to zero so that the inequality won't be undefined.. so x should not be equal to -4 and 4 , right?

  7. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    if thats not good maybe im doing it the wrong way D:

  8. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    i can not help you there i really can not deal with immaginary numbers

  9. iforgot
    • 3 years ago
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    sorry

  10. eroshea
    • 3 years ago
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    ok, that's fine.. thanks :)

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