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kenneyfamily

  • 3 years ago

Given A = 67o, B = 13o, and b = 20.3, which of the following can be used to solve the triangle? a. Law of Sines b. Law of Cosines c. Hero's Formula d. Cannot be solved.

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  1. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    those are degrees

  2. AERONIK
    • 3 years ago
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    cosine formula is a good option

  3. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah. Law of sines: \[\frac{\sin(a)}{A}=\frac{\sin(b)}{b}\] Law of cosines is \[c^2 = a^2+b^2 - 2ab\cos(C)\] So what are you given that can be used here?

  4. Praja_01
    • 3 years ago
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    cannot be solved

  5. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    Sorry the law of sines should have been: \[\frac{\sin(A)}{a}=\frac{\sin(B)}{b}\]

  6. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    the angles

  7. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    oh and side b

  8. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes it can. You have 1 side and three angles

  9. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    so law of sines?

  10. freewilly922
    • 3 years ago
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    And i flipped all my capitol letters with the convention. Yes, Multiple uses of Law of sines would solve the triangle. You would have to do a 180-a-b to get angle c though...

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