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kenneyfamily

  • 3 years ago

write an equation of a sine function with amplitude 3, period 3pi/2 and phase shift pi/4

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  1. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    is it y=3sin(3x/2-pi/4)?

  2. AERONIK
    • 3 years ago
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    3sin((4/3)t+(pi/4))

  3. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    what about -3sin(4x/3-pi/4)?

  4. AERONIK
    • 3 years ago
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    general equation of a simple harmonic oscillator is Asin(wt). where A is the amplitude and w is the angular frequency.. amd 2pi/w is the time period...

  5. AERONIK
    • 3 years ago
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    the equation you are giving should be a function of time and not distance... and by adding a minus sign you are just changing its phase by pi.

  6. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    so my answer is wrong?

  7. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    a. y = -3 sin (3x/2 - 3π/8) b. y = 3 sin (4x/3 - π/3) c. y = -3 sin (4x/3 - π/4) d. y = 3 sin (3x/2 - π/4)

  8. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    those are my choices @AERONIK

  9. AERONIK
    • 3 years ago
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    you got me wrong friend, your choices are definitely correct....

  10. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    wait i'm confused

  11. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\huge y=a \sin(bx-c)+d\]\[a=amplitude\]\[\frac{2\pi}{b}=period\]\[c=phase \; shift\]

  12. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Let's figure out our b term. \[\large \frac{2\pi}{b}=\frac{3\pi}{2}\]\[\large b=\frac{4}{3}\] I hope I calculated that correctly hehe

  13. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\large y=3\sin\left(\frac{4}{3}x-\frac{\pi}{4}\right)\]

  14. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Mmmmm I'm not sure if I did that correctly, was I suppose to factor the 4/3 into the pi/4? I forget...

  15. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    thats not an option :(

  16. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmm

  17. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    wait yes i think so

  18. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Yah I think the b is suppose to be like this... \[\huge y=a \sin (b(x-c))+d\]

  19. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Which IS one of your options, if you distribute the 4/3 to the pi/4 term.

  20. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmm how did you arrive at your answer? :o

  21. kenneyfamily
    • 3 years ago
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    i think its b. y = 3 sin (4x/3 - π/3)

  22. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmmm I think so too :O

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