Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

baldymcgee6

  • 3 years ago

Which formula based on partial derivatives provides the slope of the level curve z = f(x,y) ?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I know the answer... But I don't know why.

  2. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What is the answer? Maybe it'll refresh my memory ^^ heh

  3. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I cant get the del sign in latex :/

  4. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its ummm nambla i think.. \nambla

  5. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i thought it was \del

  6. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    nabla*

  7. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i'll try :)

  8. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    nope thats an upside down triangle

  9. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yah that's the... del operator :o do you want the one with the vector arrow above it..? :o

  10. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \frac{ dy }{ dx } = -\frac{\del f /\del x}{\del f/\del y}

  11. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i mean like the one used on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Partial_derivative

  12. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\partial \]

  13. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ahhh \partial

  14. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\Huge\frac{ dy }{ dx } = -\frac{\partial f /\partial x}{\partial f/\partial y}\]

  15. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\huge \vec \nabla f(x,y)=\left<\frac{\partial f}{\partial x}, \frac{\partial f}{\partial y}\right>\]

  16. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh sorry i didn't notice u already found it, hehe

  17. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oo, yours is fancy, i dont know what the nabla is though, thats okay...

  18. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yah i been trying to figure out latex the last couple of weeks :) it's kinda interesting

  19. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    very interesting.. i'm pressured to use it for one of my math classes, i try to avoid it.. :)

  20. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    anyways, do you get the question?

  21. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the nabla thing is the "gradient" of f, it's the direction of greatest increase from a surface. It ummmmmm... i would try to draw a picture but i'm not sure i have the greatest understanding of it myself... :\ hmm

  22. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    haha, thats okay.. i'll learn that when i get to that.

  23. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy