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dx13 Group Title

Two blocks are on a frictionless, horizontal surface. Block II is stationary and has a spring attached facing block I, which approaches with a speed v. The spring compression is a maximum when the blocks have the same velocity. Briefly explain why this is so.

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. AERONIK Group Title
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    use momentum conservation equations or solve the problem using the concept of reduced mass from the cm frame...

    • one year ago
  2. dx13 Group Title
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    no I figured out the different velocities and the compression I need to know why the max compression is when they are at the same velocity, I need a conceptual explanation rather than the computational one.

    • one year ago
  3. AERONIK Group Title
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    actually this result comes only when you solve it that way, there is no perfect conceptual reason for it, it is just the way nature works and you get to know that by solving some trivial equations

    • one year ago
  4. dx13 Group Title
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    would it have anything to do with it being an elastic collision and that this may be the point in which the most kinetic energy has been converted in potential energy in the spring?

    • one year ago
  5. AERONIK Group Title
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    the 2 blocks will never collide with each other.

    • one year ago
  6. dx13 Group Title
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    yes but I mean as a system it would be an elastic collision, such as if block II is thought of as a whole object not as a block and spring, it would be an elastic collision between the two systems

    • one year ago
  7. AERONIK Group Title
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    yes it will be elastic just to say that energy is not lost when the block collides with the spring...

    • one year ago
  8. dx13 Group Title
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    and the energy would briefly be transferred into potential energy of the spring due to compression so when the velocities are the same that would mean the spring has its max potential energy is there a reason for that?

    • one year ago
  9. AERONIK Group Title
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    yes correct..

    • one year ago
  10. dx13 Group Title
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    but is there a reason it happens at that moment?

    • one year ago
  11. AERONIK Group Title
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    no it just comes that way naturally and that is what the equations tell, due to the spring the first block slows and the second block fastens and it so becomes tht the compression is max, when both have the same velocity.

    • one year ago
  12. dx13 Group Title
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    I see I understand what you mean I'm just trying to put that in terms of an explanation of the equations since I can see the graph of it but I'm having trouble putting it into a conceptual explanation past thats just the way it works.

    • one year ago
  13. AERONIK Group Title
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    strange but true,

    • one year ago
  14. dx13 Group Title
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    ok thank you I'll try and go from there and I'll come back if anything else comes up thanks for your help.

    • one year ago
  15. AERONIK Group Title
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    welcome. where are you from ?

    • one year ago
  16. AERONIK Group Title
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    i mean which school ?

    • one year ago
  17. dx13 Group Title
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    im still in high school this is for a physics ap course

    • one year ago
  18. AERONIK Group Title
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    in the united states ?

    • one year ago
  19. dx13 Group Title
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    yes

    • one year ago
  20. dx13 Group Title
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    which school are you from?

    • one year ago
  21. Shadowys Group Title
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    It is because when both blocks are of the same velocity, their relative speed to each other is zero. I.e. The block does not see the other block moving. It is impossible to have the blocks phase through each other so their relative velocity at that time must be same, i.e. zero. When such an event happens, it also happens that the spring cannot be compressed further. Do you follow?

    • one year ago
  22. AERONIK Group Title
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    his question is why cant the spring compress further when such an event takes place?

    • one year ago
  23. Shadowys Group Title
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    As said, during that even, due to the blocks unable to phase into each other, the spring will not compress further. The blocks cannot go into one another.

    • one year ago
  24. Shadowys Group Title
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    Naturally, from logic, since the blocks cannot go into each other, they have to bounce away. So, during that time, the spring is max. compressed.

    • one year ago
  25. AERONIK Group Title
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    during such a collision the maximum compression doesnt mean that the spring is totallly compressed, it is the highest limit that the spring is compressed with the particular given speed of the blocks...

    • one year ago
  26. Shadowys Group Title
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    Yes, that's why the choice of words is max. compression. :)

    • one year ago
  27. AERONIK Group Title
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    yes that word is quite misleading...

    • one year ago
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