Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Panda223RulerZ

  • 3 years ago

Please explain, 2/3k + 6 = -12

  • This Question is Closed
  1. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The whole idea is to get 'k' known as the variable by itself.

  2. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Why not first... subtract 6 from both sides? Then, what do you get?

  3. Panda223RulerZ
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    2/3k = -18?

  4. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Good.

  5. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Now, what we can do to get rid of the fraction... is to multiply by 3 on both sides. What do you get?

  6. Panda223RulerZ
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    would that be 6 = -54?

  7. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    2k = -54 because the 3 basically just canceled out on the left side.

  8. Panda223RulerZ
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ohh, gotchya

  9. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Divide by 2 and what do you get?

  10. Panda223RulerZ
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    k = -27

  11. MathLegend
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Good.

  12. Panda223RulerZ
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Awesome ! Thank you sooo muchh !

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy