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Dido525

  • 3 years ago

Find the derivative:

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  1. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\frac{ d }{ dx }\int\limits_{x^2}^{x^3}e ^{t^2+t} dt\]

  2. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    So I tried to use the fundamental theorem of calculus:

  3. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    Is my work wrong?

  4. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmmmm no, it looks correct :O Didn't we just go over this problem like last week? XD Maybe that was someone else. heh

  5. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah we did. However apparently the professor said it's wrong...

  6. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmmmmmm

  7. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Mmmmmmmm nope you did it correctly, even wolfram agrees. http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=%28d%2Fdx%29+integral_%7Bx%5E2%7D%5E%7Bx%5E3%7De%5E%7Bt%5E2%2Bt%7D+dt Maybe the teacher wrote it down wrong or something...

  8. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh, there shouldn't be a +C, maybe that's what he's fussing about? :o

  9. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    There should be. It's an indefinite intergal.

  10. zepdrix
    • 3 years ago
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    Why would you say it's indefinite? :o even though the limits are variables, they are certainly definite. :D So ANY constant that shows up, will end up being subtracted when you take away the value evaluated at the lower limit.

  11. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
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    Hmm good point.

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