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hba

  • 3 years ago

A tutorial for @mikala1

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  1. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Huge{\bf{Distance\ Between\ Two\ Points:}}\] Let (x1,y1) and (x2,y2) be any two points.Then the distance between the two points is given by: \[D=\sqrt{(x _{2}-x _{1)^2+(y _{2}-y _{1})^2}}\] **************************Lets take an example***************************************** Example 1) Find the distance between the points (4,5) and (2,1) Solution : (x1,y1)=(4,5) and (x2,y2)=(2,1) Lets Use the formula, \[D=\sqrt{(x _{2}-x _{1)^2+(y _{2}-y _{1})^2}}\] \[D=\sqrt{(2-4)^2+(1-5)^2}\] \[D=\sqrt{(-2)^2+(-4)^2}\] \[D=\sqrt{4+16}\] \[D=\sqrt{20}\]

  2. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Huge{\bf{LINEAR\ FUNCTION:}}\] A function described by the equation \[y=mx+c \] or \[f(x)=mx+c \] is called a linear function. Where, m=slope c=y-intercept Note:The y-intercept is the value of y when x=0.

  3. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Huge{\bf{SLOPE :}}\]Let (x1,y1) and (x2,y2) be the two distinct points on a straight line such that x1is not equal to x2,then \[m=y_2-y_1/x_2-x_1\]

  4. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Lets me show you an example.|dw:1353397915835:dw||dw:1353398044566:dw|

  5. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1353398513728:dw|

  6. mikala1
    • 3 years ago
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    thank you it is great but this can be for every one

  7. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Maybe.

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