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NY,NY Group Title

Need help with drawing in the contour lines on a map. The contour interval is 5 m.

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. NY,NY Group Title
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    There's just a bunch of numbers and it says to draw in the contour lines.

    • 2 years ago
  2. timo86m Group Title
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    ooh upload a pic

    • 2 years ago
  3. timo86m Group Title
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    of the problem

    • 2 years ago
  4. NY,NY Group Title
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    • 2 years ago
  5. NY,NY Group Title
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    its super ugly i know.... :/

    • 2 years ago
  6. NY,NY Group Title
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    #14

    • 2 years ago
  7. timo86m Group Title
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    Contour interval is the actual change in elevation represented by the space between two adjacent topographic "rings". For example, if there is a contour interval of 20 feet, each topographic line on the map represents going either up or down by 20 feet of elevation (and sometimes it's hard to tell which). For convenience, many mapmakers include numbers every four or five lines to tell you what elevation is represented by that line.

    • 2 years ago
  8. NY,NY Group Title
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    Right. So on the map it's going up by 5s. So I started at 10 and connected all the 10s. Im just not sure if I've done it right because it doesn't look like a map at all. It looks like a bunch of random pencil thingies.

    • 2 years ago
  9. geoffb Group Title
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    No, it's not right as you've drawn it. You need to connect all the multiples of 5, drawing between two data points as necessary (e.g., if you were drawing the contour line for 30 m, it would go between 33 and 28). It might look something like: |dw:1353377851980:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  10. geoffb Group Title
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    Not sure if this will help you visualize it: http://egsc.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/teachers-packets/mapshow/graphics/contour.gif

    • 2 years ago
  11. NY,NY Group Title
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    wouldn't the 40 line in your picture have it's own line right on top of it? and the outer line that you've drawn, is it connecting 25 m ?

    • 2 years ago
  12. geoffb Group Title
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    The 40 is on its own, so it's really a matter of technique. It could also be marked by a point, but that is hard to see. As far as I can remember, it is common to draw a small circle around the peak if it happens to be a multiple of your contour lines (in this case, 40 is a multiple of 5).

    • 2 years ago
  13. geoffb Group Title
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    Yes, the outer line signifies 25 m in my example.

    • 2 years ago
  14. NY,NY Group Title
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    But i have connected all the multiples of five. I mean Im not finished, but most of the multiples ive connected them.

    • 2 years ago
  15. geoffb Group Title
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    Right, but when a contour is closed off it indicates a peak. For example, 14 and 18 in the upper-right corner. Those are not peaks. Taking a quick look at the numbers, your map should look more like this: |dw:1353380276652:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  16. NY,NY Group Title
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    so is it ok if some points dont have a circle around them?

    • 2 years ago
  17. geoffb Group Title
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    Absolutely!

    • 2 years ago
  18. geoffb Group Title
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    All they are is plotted points. Imagine you climb a mountain. You plot the elevation at every point possible. Then, when you get home, you put those elevations on a piece of paper. That's great, but it's hard to interpret. So, you decide to draw contour lines. Each line indicates (in this case) 10 m, 15 m, 20 m, etc. These contour lines give you a sense of the elevation gradient (i.e., change). Lines that are close together indicate steep hills, while lines that are far apart indicate very gradual hills.

    • 2 years ago
  19. NY,NY Group Title
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    • 2 years ago
  20. NY,NY Group Title
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    i cant exactly seem to conncet the lines...

    • 2 years ago
  21. geoffb Group Title
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    That looks great! Looks like there's some trouble with the 40 m line below the 50 m peak, but overall you've done well.

    • 2 years ago
  22. NY,NY Group Title
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    how do you think i can connect that line? theres a 38 mark which is less than 30 so i cant put it in the circle...

    • 2 years ago
  23. NY,NY Group Title
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    less than 40 i meant *

    • 2 years ago
  24. geoffb Group Title
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    See the leg of the line on the left, that ends between 42 and 36?

    • 2 years ago
  25. geoffb Group Title
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    Bend it up, above 38 and below 45. Then do the same (the numbers to the right are the same). Then, take it above 38 to connect it at the 40.

    • 2 years ago
  26. geoffb Group Title
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    |dw:1353386235523:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  27. NY,NY Group Title
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    i dunt have space to connect the 20 line... or 15 or 10 should i just leave it unconnected? maybe the teacher will understand...

    • 2 years ago
  28. geoffb Group Title
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    Oh, I see what you mean. You just end them at the bottom of the map. |dw:1353387355947:dw|

    • 2 years ago
  29. NY,NY Group Title
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    oh ok. thanks :D

    • 2 years ago
  30. NY,NY Group Title
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    wow that took a long time...

    • 2 years ago
  31. geoffb Group Title
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    You did good!

    • 2 years ago
  32. NY,NY Group Title
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    thank you :D

    • 2 years ago
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