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SWAG

  • 3 years ago

Anything raised to the zero power will equal 1. True False

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  1. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    @jazy

  2. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    @jazy ?

  3. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    @SWAG According to exponential rule, \[n^0=1\]

  4. rizwan_uet
    • 3 years ago
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    its trueeeee

  5. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    what is \[0^0\]?

  6. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    But\[0^0 = Undefined\]

  7. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    so that makes it true?

  8. rizwan_uet
    • 3 years ago
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    yes ofcourse

  9. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    @swag - do you know the following rule:\[\frac{x^a}{x^b}=x^{a-b}\]

  10. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    No

  11. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    I think all the mods are in house today :D

  12. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    Foreal iv never had so many people or moderators on my question before

  13. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    Technically, most of the time \(0^0\) is regarded as undefined, but some mathematicians implement the idea that \(0^0=1\) when the feel that it "makes more sense" so to speak.

  14. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    it's a subtle issue really

  15. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    take a simple case:\[\frac{x^4}{x^3}=\frac{x\times x\times x\times x}{x\times x\times x}=x\]agreed?

  16. cinar
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Large \infty^0=?\]

  17. cinar
    • 3 years ago
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    well, you can say infinity is not a number, but still...

  18. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    Right

  19. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    who are you responding to there?

  20. SWAG
    • 3 years ago
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    @asnaseer

  21. cinar
    • 3 years ago
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    it does not a number, it says anything (:

  22. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Yeah :D

  23. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    I think @asnaseer originally showed me this: http://www.faqs.org/faqs/sci-math-faq/specialnumbers/0to0/#b

  24. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    ok, so you should be able to see now that:\[\frac{x^4}{x^3}=x^{4-3}=x^1=x\]

  25. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    this is where the rule comes from. so, taking the rule:\[\frac{x^a}{x^b}=x^{a-b}\]if you let b=a, you get:\[\frac{x^a}{x^a}=x^{a-a}=x^0\]but:\[\frac{x^a}{x^a}=1\]therefore:\[x^0=1\]apart from the case where x=0

  26. cinar
    • 3 years ago
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    \[\Large N^0=1\]and \[ \Large 0^N=0\]but \[\Large 0^0=0 \] or \[\Large 0^0= 1 \]?

  27. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    Anything raised to the zero power will equal 1. <---So this would be False, since not EVERY number follows this rule.

  28. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    No it's debatable

  29. asnaseer
    • 3 years ago
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    if you look at the link @TuringTest posted above, it states under the section "The following is a list of reasons why 0^0 should be 1." some reasons as to why we generally regard \(0^0=1\)

  30. jazy
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay according to my notes in Algebra...it'd be true. I prefer going with what the lesson says. (;

  31. TuringTest
    • 3 years ago
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    here's another good rundown of the trickyness in finding a direct answer http://www.askamathematician.com/2010/12/q-what-does-00-zero-raised-to-the-zeroth-power-equal-why-do-mathematicians-and-high-school-teachers-disagree/

  32. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    I think so that the answer is TRUE.

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