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bii17

  • 3 years ago

integrate sqrt(1 + sqrt(x)) dx

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  1. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    did u try substituting 1+sqrt x = t^2 ??

  2. bii17
    • 3 years ago
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    y t^2 ?

  3. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    because i wanted to eliminate the sqrt sign....

  4. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    outer sqrt.

  5. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    try that substitution, if u don't get it, i'll help you....

  6. harsh314
    • 3 years ago
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    just a substituion of 1+sqrt x to t would work/

  7. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    yes, that too will work....it will just involve fractional powers.......

  8. harsh314
    • 3 years ago
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    yo yo.............

  9. malevolence19
    • 3 years ago
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    I mean you're saying the same thing: Either you do: \[\sqrt{1+\sqrt x}=\psi \implies \psi^2 = 1+\sqrt x\] They are literally the same thing.

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