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germanphysics

  • 3 years ago

Why is KCl a better salt-bridge than NaCl?

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  1. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    Na+ is higher on the chart and has a larger reduction potential, this is the cathode of the voltage. This means that the K+ is the anode of the cell.

  2. mayankdevnani
    • 3 years ago
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    ok @germanphysics

  3. germanphysics
    • 3 years ago
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    I don't get, why I use for example for a galvanic cell KCl as the saltbridge between the two half cells... I mean, why do I need an anode, when I have a calomel and a silver chloride electrode? Aren't they cathode and anode?

  4. germanphysics
    • 3 years ago
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    *So I get that I need a electrolyte but I don't get why I prefer KCl :D

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