Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Dido525

  • 3 years ago

Summation limit:

  • This Question is Closed
  1. math>philosophy
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    plzzzz just type the question when you post

  2. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1353736632757:dw|

  3. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well it's better when I draw it out.

  4. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answer is 8 but I have no idea why. @math>philosophy @satellite73

  5. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the answer is 8? i don't think that is right

  6. math>philosophy
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It shouldn't be 8. Are you still doing Riemann sums?

  7. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well according to maple it's 8.

  8. math>philosophy
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Then there must be a syntax error

  9. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I checked on wolfram too.

  10. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh i am a dope

  11. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Let me double check.

  12. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the index is \(i\) but the expression is \(\frac{8}{n}\)

  13. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah.

  14. math>philosophy
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh

  15. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so it is a constant

  16. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well I know that but then we have: |dw:1353736967140:dw|

  17. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\sum_{i=1}^n\frac{8}{n}=\frac{8}{n}+\frac{8}{n}+...+\frac{8}{n}\] where there are \(n\) terms and that gives you 8 for all \(n\)

  18. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How? If I said n =1 and then n=2 they aren't the same.

  19. perl
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    sigma of 1 is n , so

  20. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ohh right!!!! I feel like an idiot....

  21. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    are you summing over \(i\) or over \(n\) ?

  22. Dido525
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Got it! Thanks everyone :) .

  23. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  24. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy