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mbhatti_95

  • 3 years ago

Does the limit of e^x exist at 1) x=0 2) x=+infinity 3) x= -infinity Please give details

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  1. ksaimouli
    • 3 years ago
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    !-yes x=yes 3=yes but x=infinity no

  2. mbhatti_95
    • 3 years ago
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    how?

  3. ksaimouli
    • 3 years ago
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    graph it from left it is 0 and from right it is 0

  4. mbhatti_95
    • 3 years ago
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    why does it not exist at x= infinity>?

  5. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    for staters, there is not such value as "infinity" so we can only take the limit of the function as x moves further and further out

  6. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    is there a value that e^x approaches as x gets bigger and bigger; as x approaches infinity? or does e^x continue to grow larger and larger without bound?

  7. mbhatti_95
    • 3 years ago
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    larger and larger without bound.

  8. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    since e^x does not "settle down" to a nice limit that can be quantified; and moves ever larger without bounds; it has no limit

  9. mbhatti_95
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks a ton :)

  10. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    youre welcome

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