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KonradZuse

  • 3 years ago

1. Let (u,v) be the Euclidean inner product on R ^2, and let u = (1,1) v = (3,2), w = (0, -1), and k = 3. Compute the following. b. {kv, w}

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  1. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    woah it got messed up....

  2. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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  3. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    @amistre64 @UnkleRhaukus

  4. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    did I do this correctly?

  5. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    im not sure i understand the notation in the question

  6. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    what does: b. {kv, w} mean?

  7. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    u = (1,1) v = (3,2), w = (0, -1), and k = 3 kv: 3(3, 2) w: (0,-1) -------------- dot product is: -6 but what does the b. mean?

  8. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    part b.

  9. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    :p

  10. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    the Euclidean inner product should be the same thing right?

  11. amistre64
    • 3 years ago
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    yes, inner product and dot procuct appear to be synonomous

  12. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    This is honestly tyhe third time this has appeared in the book.... Idk why we are relearning it :p.

  13. KonradZuse
    • 3 years ago
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    I guess the only thing we really learned was it being "weighed." with the 2 and the 3....

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