Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

pratu043

  • 3 years ago

ABCD is a quadrilateral where AB is parallel to DC. If x = (4y)/3 and y = (3z)/8 find x, y, and z.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1353909972372:dw|

  2. darthjavier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\angle A+\angle D=180^\circ\\\angle B + \angle C=180^\circ\] Try to solve it now :)

  3. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I tried but I'm getting z as more than 90 degrees.

  4. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    z is an acute angle isn't it?

  5. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    z + y = 180 and \[y = \frac{ 3z }{ 8 }\] \[z + \frac{ 3z }{ 8 } = 180\] \[\frac{ 8z + 3z }{ 8 } = 180\] \[\frac{ 11z }{ 8 } = 180\] \[z = \frac{ 180\times8 }{ 11 }\]

  6. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I don't think that's right.

  7. darthjavier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Go ahead, you are right. Try to put z instead of y in your graph ;)

  8. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What do you mean 'in your graph'?

  9. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    if y = 3/8 of z, it will be smaller than z. Are you sure you have y and z labelled correctly?

  10. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes. You think it could be a printing mistake?

  11. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    No clue, but if z is acute, and y is 3/8 of z, then there's no way y can be obtuse.

  12. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yeah, I never thought of that.

  13. darthjavier
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sorry, graphic*. I mean that you have the wrong graphic or wrong data.

  14. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answers given are 96, 96 and 84.

  15. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Try it the other way around. z = 3y/8

  16. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Then you get 11y/8 = 180

  17. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \(y = \frac{180 \times 8}{11}\)

  18. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    That gives an angle of 131, meaning z would be 49. Doesn't work.

  19. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Well, it works, but not to the answers you're given. :)

  20. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes.

  21. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I already tried all that.

  22. pratu043
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well, thanks for your help anyway. I'll ask my maths teacher.

  23. geoffb
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    No problem. :)

  24. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy