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ihatealgebrasomuch

  • 3 years ago

if a dog has 72 chromosomes, how many daughter cells will be created during the single cell cycle? please help, i wasnt at school for this lesson:(

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  1. Ashleyisakitty
    • 3 years ago
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    There will be 144 cells! Good luck!

  2. DevinGT96
    • 3 years ago
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    yeah 144 is right

  3. ihatealgebrasomuch
    • 3 years ago
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    ugh, thats not in the word bank!:/

  4. ihatealgebrasomuch
    • 3 years ago
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    the only numbers in the word bank are 72, 46, 2, and 4

  5. DevinGT96
    • 3 years ago
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    if 144 isnt an answer than you doin somethin different than i am

  6. some_someone
    • 3 years ago
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    but yeah if a dog cell has 72 chromosomes there will be 144 daughter cells created during a single cell cycle. therefore, yeah u probably did a mistake? have u used 144 for something else in some other question?

  7. starwardd
    • 3 years ago
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    is there any connection exist between number of chromosome and number of daughter cells in cell division/cycle?, I dont think so, if anyone know the same please share. (@ihatealgebrasomuch.. please check the question whether it is complete or not)

  8. sunny_swim
    • 3 years ago
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    There are always 2 daughter cells produced in a single cell cycle. Each daughter cell will have 72 chromosomes.

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