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armanfantasy

can we get to zero kelvin?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Shadowys
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    if and only if you're nothing.

    • one year ago
  2. amistre64
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    heat death ..... if i remember the term correctly

    • one year ago
  3. MuH4hA
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    Nope, you cannot. And nope, the heat death of the universe is the theoretical future, if the expansion is faster as blah blah... In a nutshell: Even if you have no thermodynamic free energy, there's still zero-point-energy (QM) which results in motion. One can argue that this state might be labeled 0 K, but in practice you can't reach it either way. Depends a liiittle bit on how you gonna interpret the question...

    • one year ago
  4. bradonk
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    No!

    • one year ago
  5. amistre64
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    that kinda reminds me of a question that i had ..... my physics teacher kept saying that the universe is an isolated system in which no energy flows in or out; but I think the TV said that at the quantum level there are little bursts of energy popping in and out of existence (NOVAscience)

    • one year ago
  6. masumanwar
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    yup that is absolute zero temperature Celsius and kelvin relation is 273 +c

    • one year ago
  7. chongkhengwye
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    No. It is not possible. At 0 K, any object will not even be vibrating. That means it will be possible to locate its position with 100% certainty, which will violate Hesenberg uncertainty principle :)

    • one year ago
  8. UnkleRhaukus
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    it is not possible to get to zero Kelvin in a finite number of steps or finite time

    • one year ago
  9. armanfantasy
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    i think that no one know if we can or not how the scientist know in zero kelvin the mater the ( atom) will stop moving, because the scientist never test zero kelvin so how they know that ?

    • one year ago
  10. Shadowys
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    ah. Here's the thing. it's not that they never tested zero kelvin (in space you've got plenty of places where's it's zero kelvin) it's that they know that in zero kelvin nothing happens. That's the point. zero kelvin is when nothing happens. No vibration, no light, no nothing. And one more thing is it's mathematically impossible.

    • one year ago
  11. armanfantasy
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    I mean how can they know in zero kelvin there is no vibration or no light

    • one year ago
  12. Shadowys
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    um, the meaning of zero kelvin is no energy. Temperature almost =energy. you might want to see the laws of thermodynamics.

    • one year ago
  13. armanfantasy
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    Thanks you are right .

    • one year ago
  14. Shadowys
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    lol you're welcome :)

    • one year ago
  15. MuH4hA
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    No, he is not - pretty much all of what he wrote is bullpellet. 1) There is no point in space with 0 K - nowhere. 2) 0 K is of course by definition the point of minimal entropy, meaning: all thermal motion ceases. So you know it's so cause you defined your temperature-scale as an absolute one. 3) Why would that be mathematically inpossible? What's "mathematically" supposed to mean anyways? U imagine a perfect crystal with no 'jiggeling' -> there you go, you just got to 0 K.. 4) The meaning of zero K is _not_ 'no energy'. It's no thermal energy and there is a huge difference. So please - don't go ahead and "explain" stuff you know nothing about. Even if you meant well, it's really not helping the party that asked, if it's all half-true-gibberish. Same goes to the guy with the "in a finite number of steps or finite time" -> doesn't mean anything aside from idk - probably sounds cool or whatnot... armanfatasy: just look it up on wikipedia ;)

    • one year ago
  16. Shadowys
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    you might want to review the laws of thermodynamics too :) a perfect crystal with no jiggling is not possible since...well, i think you understand the problems with 0k is the electrons that exists as a wave and that they are in constant "motion". always. if not...they don't exist.

    • one year ago
  17. Shadowys
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    space is pretty big, nearly infinite. do you want to check on the space in between galaxies where there is nothing?

    • one year ago
  18. MuH4hA
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    Shadowys: http://yourlogicalfallacyis.com/strawman I used the word "imagine" - I know it's not practically, but this was a response to your claim, that it is "mathematically" impossible - whatever that is supposed to mean :P Also - as I stated already in a post above - you always have whats called zero-point energy[1]. (As far as we know - CMB[2] is everywhere, too. You might want to look it up, it's quite interesting). So no, I don't want to check every point in space. I just assume that the QM-nature of the universe isn't "turned off" somewhere - pretty much all physicists do that, btw ;) 1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-point_energy 2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmic_microwave_background_radiation

    • one year ago
  19. Shadowys
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    yes, i'm aware that there remains residual background radiation, lol i guess i shouldn't take that assumption.

    • one year ago
  20. armanfantasy
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    Thanks MuH4hA

    • one year ago
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