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Sunshine447

  • 2 years ago

I really don't get this lesson question: Which statement is true for the circle? http://learn.flvs.net/webdav/assessment_images/educator_geometry_v14/0800/0800_G8_Q29a.gif Its center is at the ordered pair of 1 over 2, minus 1, and the radius is minus five over two units. Its center is at the ordered pair of minus 1 over 2, 1, and the radius is five over two units. Its center is at the ordered pair of 1 over 2, minus 1, and the radius is five over two units. Its center is at the ordered pair of minus 1 over 2, 1, and the radius is minus five over two units.

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  1. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    @amistre64

  2. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    @jim_thompson5910

  3. mathstudent55
    • 2 years ago
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    The link doesn't work

  4. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    it works on mine

  5. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    @AccessDenied

  6. dread907
    • 2 years ago
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    This link works for you because it is on a course website and you have to be logged in to view it, do you know how to take a screenshot?

  7. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    umm i think lemme try

  8. dread907
    • 2 years ago
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    Okay if you need help, reply back with your computer OS(Operating System, Mac or Windows)

  9. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    Here's the whole thing as pasted from the lesson

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  10. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    a radius is always positive

  11. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    okay...?

  12. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    that rules out 2 of your choices

  13. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    so it's either B or C, but I still don't know which

  14. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    the (x,y) pair at the center will make the (x-a)^2 and (y-b)^2 terms zero does that make sense?

  15. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    not really, no...

  16. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    usually they say (x-h)^2 + (y-k)^2 = r^2 and the center is at (h,k) with radius r

  17. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    how do we get h and k?

  18. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    so if you see (x- 1/2) that means the x value of the center is +1/2

  19. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    okay

  20. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    in this case you match your equation to the "generic" one match (x-h)^2 + (y-k)^2 = r^2 (x-1/2)^2 + (y + 1)^2 = 25/4

  21. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    matching y-k to y+1 you have to rewrite y+1 as y - (-1) now you see y - k matches y - (-1) and k is -1

  22. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    or remember that you want the y value that makes (y+1)^2 zero. that would be y= -1

  23. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    so the Y is -1?

  24. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    then it's C? Right?

  25. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    yes.

  26. Sunshine447
    • 2 years ago
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    Thank you soooooo much! I'm going to go write you a testimonial! haha

  27. phi
    • 2 years ago
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    thank you

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