anonymous
  • anonymous
Evaluate the expression without using a calculator.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\sin (\pi/3) + \cos (\pi/3)\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
An entry level explanation would be useful.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Pi/3=60º as is well known cos60º=1/2 and sin60º=sqrt3/2

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anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
Should I have converted them to degrees then?
anonymous
  • anonymous
allow me to disagree with @myko this question has nothing to do with degrees. forget degrees it has to do with numbers find the sine and cosine from the coordinates on the unit circle
anonymous
  • anonymous
if it is more clear for you, then yes, if not just stay with radians
anonymous
  • anonymous
do not start a trig problem by converting numbers to degrees, it is a bad habit and will mess you up later if you are working with numbers, stick with numbers
anonymous
  • anonymous
degrees are just, sometimes, more evident to place a apoint in the circle. But I agree with @satellite73 that it is more strait with rad
anonymous
  • anonymous
sine and cosine are functions of numbers, not angles. they correspond to the functions of angles if the angles are measured in radians
anonymous
  • anonymous
alright that seems to make sense. Will you walk me through what you mean by "find the sine and cosine from the coordinates on the unit circle?"
anonymous
  • anonymous
look at the last page of the cheat sheet i sent locate the point on the unit circle corresponding to \(\frac{\pi}{3}\) 2x ^{5}+x ^{3}-7x+14
anonymous
  • anonymous
corresponding to \(\frac{\pi}{3}\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
alright I see an ordered pair that looks suspiciously like sin and cos that you mentioned earlier
anonymous
  • anonymous
you should see the ordered pair \((\frac{1}{2},\frac{\sqrt{3}}{2})\) the first coordinate is \(\cos(\frac{\pi}{3})\) and the second coordinate is \(\sin(\frac{\pi}{3})\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So what if this is on a test and I'm not allowed the cheat sheet?
anonymous
  • anonymous
This one seems fairly easy now I know this forms a 60 30 90 triangle but what about something more irregular or do these always form 30-60-90 or 45-45-90 triangles?
anonymous
  • anonymous
@satellite73
anonymous
  • anonymous
(The ones they ask me to solve without a calculator.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
@satellite73

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