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pseudopaul

  • 3 years ago

What is the difference between membrane distillation and pervaporation ? They seem to be so similar.

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  1. Lucasoliveira_1234
    • 3 years ago
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    In comparison to other, the pervaporation process is a relatively new, having common elements, reverse osmosis and gas permeation (Feng and Huang, 1997). The separating liquid mixtures by pervaporation difference in vapor pressure between the feed and the permeate. This difference in vapor pressure can be obtained in different ways: by vacuum applied to the permeate ,the most used laboratory procedure, or by cooling the permeate vapor, causing a partial vacuum, and most common industrially. The membrane destillation use heat streans to provide the evaporations. The pervaporation uses differente methods. I hope it help.

  2. pseudopaul
    • 3 years ago
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    Thanks for you reply :D. I just want to correct you in one small detail. Pervaporation was first reported in 1906, L. Kahlenberg and investigated only in 1955. That makes it more old than RO at-least. But your answer did help. Thanks again. All this I recently found out Chao

  3. Koikkara
    • 3 years ago
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    Well, plz close the question, if you found the satisfactory solution. Thank You..

  4. Ejimdonalds
    • one year ago
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    mehn, you guys are sounding like senators.

  5. Prince_Vegeta
    • 6 months ago
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    hmmmm

  6. Kakarot
    • 6 months ago
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    am I veiwing closed questions?

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