Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

sasogeek

what does absolute value mean?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    mathematical description or layman description?

    • one year ago
  2. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |x| --> x if x>0, or -x if x<0

    • one year ago
  3. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wha...? :s i'm lost

    • one year ago
  4. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    lol that's the mathematical description. in layman terms, if x is positive, like 4, then the absolute value of it is 4. if x is negative, like -5, then the absolute value of it is 5.

    • one year ago
  5. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    how do u determine it?

    • one year ago
  6. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Do you have an example?

    • one year ago
  7. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    find the absolute value of x

    • one year ago
  8. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I liked @Shadowys 's description.

    • one year ago
  9. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    His mathematical description was a great answer for your question.

    • one year ago
  10. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i know if i have |x| the solution is |x|=x that i know. my question is, how do you arrive at that conclusion... proof?

    • one year ago
  11. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    it's the definition. the proof is the first line i gave you. the mathematical description.

    • one year ago
  12. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    It's only x if x is positive. It is -x if x is negative. It's one of those things that is so simple that it becomes tricky again. Say we are looking for |x| and x is -4... the answer is 4... but from the perspective of the original x, the answer is -(-4)=4.

    • one year ago
  13. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    google: "The magnitude of a real number without regard to its sign" i don't see that in ur description/definition/proof.... there's nothing related to magnitudes :/

    • one year ago
  14. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I've never seen a more rigorous proof than the piece-wise description given by @Shadowys . The literal meaning is: distance from the origin.

    • one year ago
  15. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i.e. that's the layman terms. also, i.e. that's in terms of vectors. |-4|-->4 |-2|-->2 |-x|-->x, for x>0

    • one year ago
  16. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i don't think it's enough to settle with |x|=x, |-z|=z ...

    • one year ago
  17. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes. it is not.

    • one year ago
  18. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it doesn't make sense

    • one year ago
  19. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |x| --> x if x>0, or -x if x<0 this is the definition. in fact, it's called the absolute value function. that means it must be like that. MUST

    • one year ago
  20. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    why?

    • one year ago
  21. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    there is no why in this. it is defined that way. the reason you're learning this because this particular function has importance in geometrical analysis.

    • one year ago
  22. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    let's just say there is a why. there's a reason for everything, if not i could just make my own math rules and say everyone MUST follow that rule.... unless u don't know the answer to the why in this... :/

    • one year ago
  23. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Zarkon

    • one year ago
  24. Shadowys
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes. you can make your own rules, if they have an importance in something and if they conform to the original rules of mathematics.

    • one year ago
  25. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well i'm still not satisfied with the given answer.

    • one year ago
  26. Zarkon
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if x<0 then x is negative...so -x is positive thus |x|=-x

    • one year ago
  27. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @Shadowys would you say that |y+1|=y+1?

    • one year ago
  28. Zarkon
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    only if \(y+1\ge0\)

    • one year ago
  29. Zarkon
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if \(y+1<0\) then \(|y+1|=-(y+1)\)

    • one year ago
  30. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what's with the magnitude mentioned in the definition by google?

    • one year ago
  31. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    magnitude is distance... right?

    • one year ago
  32. EulerGroupie
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    From a linear geometric perspective, yes. If we are talking about pressure, for example, not really.

    • one year ago
  33. Zarkon
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the absolute value of a number is its distanceto the origin

    • one year ago
  34. sasogeek
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay now this makes more sense than the earlier explanation/definition... thanks :)

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.