sasogeek
  • sasogeek
what does absolute value mean?
Mathematics
chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
mathematical description or layman description?
anonymous
  • anonymous
|x| --> x if x>0, or -x if x<0
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
wha...? :s i'm lost

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anonymous
  • anonymous
lol that's the mathematical description. in layman terms, if x is positive, like 4, then the absolute value of it is 4. if x is negative, like -5, then the absolute value of it is 5.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
how do u determine it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Do you have an example?
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
find the absolute value of x
anonymous
  • anonymous
I liked @Shadowys 's description.
anonymous
  • anonymous
His mathematical description was a great answer for your question.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
i know if i have |x| the solution is |x|=x that i know. my question is, how do you arrive at that conclusion... proof?
anonymous
  • anonymous
it's the definition. the proof is the first line i gave you. the mathematical description.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's only x if x is positive. It is -x if x is negative. It's one of those things that is so simple that it becomes tricky again. Say we are looking for |x| and x is -4... the answer is 4... but from the perspective of the original x, the answer is -(-4)=4.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
google: "The magnitude of a real number without regard to its sign" i don't see that in ur description/definition/proof.... there's nothing related to magnitudes :/
anonymous
  • anonymous
I've never seen a more rigorous proof than the piece-wise description given by @Shadowys . The literal meaning is: distance from the origin.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i.e. that's the layman terms. also, i.e. that's in terms of vectors. |-4|-->4 |-2|-->2 |-x|-->x, for x>0
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
i don't think it's enough to settle with |x|=x, |-z|=z ...
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes. it is not.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
it doesn't make sense
anonymous
  • anonymous
|x| --> x if x>0, or -x if x<0 this is the definition. in fact, it's called the absolute value function. that means it must be like that. MUST
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
why?
anonymous
  • anonymous
there is no why in this. it is defined that way. the reason you're learning this because this particular function has importance in geometrical analysis.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
let's just say there is a why. there's a reason for everything, if not i could just make my own math rules and say everyone MUST follow that rule.... unless u don't know the answer to the why in this... :/
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes. you can make your own rules, if they have an importance in something and if they conform to the original rules of mathematics.
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
well i'm still not satisfied with the given answer.
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
if x<0 then x is negative...so -x is positive thus |x|=-x
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
@Shadowys would you say that |y+1|=y+1?
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
only if \(y+1\ge0\)
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
if \(y+1<0\) then \(|y+1|=-(y+1)\)
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
what's with the magnitude mentioned in the definition by google?
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
magnitude is distance... right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
From a linear geometric perspective, yes. If we are talking about pressure, for example, not really.
Zarkon
  • Zarkon
the absolute value of a number is its distanceto the origin
sasogeek
  • sasogeek
okay now this makes more sense than the earlier explanation/definition... thanks :)

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