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ludwig457

Suppose two wells are located 6 miles apart, and are drilled into a aquifer of average sand composition (i.e., hydraulic conductivity = 10 m/day). The water level in one of the wells is 40 feet, and the water level in the other well is 75 feet. If the aquifer is 3 miles wide and 50 feet deep, which of the following numbers is closest to the aquifer's actual discharge? (1 m = 3.28 feet)

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. ludwig457
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    Q= KA(H/L) Groundwater discharge can be calculated with the following equation: in which Q is an aquifer’s discharge, K is the aquifer’s hydraulic conductivity, A is the cross-sectional area of the aquifer, H is the difference in elevation of the water table between two wells, and L is the horizontal distance between the two wells. (Note that H/L is the gradient, or slope, of the water table.) 150 m3/day 800 m3/day 1,200 m3/day 8,000 m3/day

    • one year ago
  2. Algebraic!
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    H/L appears to be 35/(6*5280) feet

    • one year ago
  3. Algebraic!
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    and I guess they want you to use a rectangle to approximate the CSA?

    • one year ago
  4. ludwig457
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    yes 79,200ft

    • one year ago
  5. ludwig457
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    ft^2

    • one year ago
  6. ludwig457
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    \[Q=\frac{ (32.808ft)(79200ft ^{2})(35ft }{ 31680ft }\]

    • one year ago
  7. ludwig457
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    then i converted to meters

    • one year ago
  8. ludwig457
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    \[Q=\frac{ (9.997)(24140.16)(10.668) }{ 9656.06 }\]

    • one year ago
  9. ludwig457
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    will ft^2 convert to meters^2?

    • one year ago
  10. Algebraic!
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    You seem to have an error there...

    • one year ago
  11. Algebraic!
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    Better to convert the height and width to meters first... then find the CSA in meters^2

    • one year ago
  12. ludwig457
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    working

    • one year ago
  13. Algebraic!
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    15.24 m * 4828 m

    • one year ago
  14. ludwig457
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    73,578.72m^2

    • one year ago
  15. Algebraic!
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    yes

    • one year ago
  16. ludwig457
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    ((9.997)(73578.72)(10.668))/(9656.06)

    • one year ago
  17. ludwig457
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    working

    • one year ago
  18. ludwig457
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    812.65m^3/day

    • one year ago
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