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AyyRamz_3

for newton's laws, do you refer to acceleration as m/s^2 or N/kg?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. AyyRamz_3
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    don't you use N/kg for gravity also?

    • one year ago
  2. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    yes gravity is just a special type of acceleration.

    • one year ago
  3. AyyRamz_3
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    so in newton's laws, you go for a=N/kg instead the m/s^2?

    • one year ago
  4. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    yes because m/s^2 is just units. whereas N/kg is actually a variable representation of acceleration.

    • one year ago
  5. AyyRamz_3
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    is 1 N/kg equal to 1 m/s^2?

    • one year ago
  6. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    wait actually I'm sorry for some reason I was thinking F/m. both are units that mean the same thing.

    • one year ago
  7. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    so really use can use either to represent accleration, but typically we use m/s^2 to represent acceleration.

    • one year ago
  8. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    For Newtons second law the units would be m/s^2

    • one year ago
  9. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    is this for a homework question or are you just trying to understand units better?

    • one year ago
  10. AyyRamz_3
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    understanding the units, because im not sure what units to put after i find the acceleration?

    • one year ago
  11. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    use m/s^2

    • one year ago
  12. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    N/kg is odd, butt yes it means the same thing.

    • one year ago
  13. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    think about velocities unites, we use m/s for velocity, so to keep it consistent use m/s^2 for acceleration.

    • one year ago
  14. AyyRamz_3
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    alright!thank you and do you know what 1 newton is equivalent to?:s

    • one year ago
  15. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    yes one newton = (kgm)/s^2

    • one year ago
  16. AyyRamz_3
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    okay thanks alot!

    • one year ago
  17. VeritasVosLiberabit
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    no problem.

    • one year ago
  18. Mashy
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    See if you look at g as acceleration due to gravity.. then you normally use m/s^2.. cause even if its acceleration due to gravity.. its none the less acceleration and that has to be its SI units.. However.. there is another TOTALLY DIFFERENT way to look at g.. and that is called as gravitational field intensity.. .meaning.. how strong is the field of gravity due to earth (or for that matter any mass).. when you mean THAT way.. you usually say g = N/kg.. meaning you are saying.. how much force a UNIT mass would experience in a gravitational field... so bottom line if i said g = 9.8m/s^2... it basically says how much acceleration i would get at that point .. if i said g = 9.8 N/kg.. it means how much force is experienced by a unit mass kept at that point.. so even though they have the same physical dimensions.. they are two VERY different concepts!! and hence we use those different units!

    • one year ago
  19. Vincent-Lyon.Fr
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    First thing: there is no difference between N/kg and m/s², so both are ok. Acceleration is a kinematic concept in the first place. So it is more logical to use m/s² Even if N's 2nd law did not exist, and the unit newton had not been defined, you could still work with accelerations in m/s². When you first encounter g, it is seen as the ratio of a force by a mass as you hang a mass on a spring, so it is logical to use N/kg to define it. But then you realise an object in free fall has an acceleration equal to g as well, and then the natural unit becomes m/s². It is the same with other quantities, and it is sometimes a cultural point of view. In France, all electric fields are given in V/m, but I think I have seen a different (but same) unit on this forum, though I cannot remember which one it was, maybe N/C.

    • one year ago
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