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gerryliyana Group Title

How many number of degrees of freedom of these system??

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. gerryliyana Group Title
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    • one year ago
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  2. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    can you provide a higher quality?

    • one year ago
  3. gerryliyana Group Title
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    what do you mean?

    • one year ago
  4. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    I cannot understand the picture... it's too difficult too read

    • one year ago
  5. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    *to

    • one year ago
  6. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    wait nvm

    • one year ago
  7. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    6's? are they 6's in the partial circles?

    • one year ago
  8. gerryliyana Group Title
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    itsn't 6

    • one year ago
  9. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    I am sorry to admit I cannot, I probably just provided false hope and nothing else, I thought it were a pic of something else but I was wrong, not too good at that.. Sorry, I am truly sorry. It's running slow tonight and everything.

    • one year ago
  10. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    but at least I can provide a medal

    • one year ago
  11. gerryliyana Group Title
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    ok no problem ..., :)

    • one year ago
  12. guyofreckoning2 Group Title
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    heh, the place is running slow tonight, kinda mean to drop in and not answer someone's question

    • one year ago
  13. kr7210 Group Title
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    its a coupled oscillator and its degree of freedom is "one"

    • one year ago
  14. kr7210 Group Title
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    2*2-1-1-1=1

    • one year ago
  15. Vincent-Lyon.Fr Group Title
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    There are two degrees of freedom.

    • one year ago
  16. gerryliyana Group Title
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    why??

    • one year ago
  17. aero_elastic Group Title
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    Assuming the two rods that the masses are suspended from are fixed (their length won't change) there is two degrees of freedom in the system. The position of each rod can be written in terms of its angular displacement (1DOF each). The length of the spring too can be written in terms of the two theta terms (assuming one knows the distance between base of the two rods that the masses are suspended from). The system can be described in more terms (x,y coordinates of masses 1&2), but two are all that's needed.

    • one year ago
  18. gerryliyana Group Title
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    ok, i saw when n independent coordinates are required to specify the position of the masses of a system, the system is of n degrees of freedom. For example if the masses m1 and m2 are contrained to move vertically, at least one coordinate (just call x(t)) is required to define the location of each mass at any time. Thus te system requires altogether two coordinates to specify their positions; it is a two-degree-of-freedom system.., right???

    • one year ago
  19. Vincent-Lyon.Fr Group Title
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    You're right.

    • one year ago
  20. Vincent-Lyon.Fr Group Title
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    Is it just a question about degrees of freedom or do you have to derive the equations of motion of this system?

    • one year ago
  21. gerryliyana Group Title
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    very nice.., thank u @Vincent-Lyon.Fr . it isn't only a question about degrees of freedom, i do have to derive the equations of motion, but in coupled oscillations of a loaded string

    • one year ago
  22. gerryliyana Group Title
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    until to obtain wave equation

    • one year ago
  23. gerryliyana Group Title
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    follow me: I finally did read a book "The Physics of Vibrations and Waves) by HJ Pain. It show how the coupled vibrations in the periodic structur of the loaded string become waves in a continuous medium. The equations of motion of the r-th mass to be: \[\frac{ d^{2}y_{r} }{ dt^{2} } = \frac{ T }{ma } (y_{r+1} - 2y_{r} + y_{r-1})\] then separation a = dx and consider the limit dx --> 0 as the masses merge into a continuous heavy string. The: \[\frac{ d^{2}y_{r} }{ dt^{2} } = \frac{ T }{ m } \left( \frac{ y_{r+1}-2y_{r} + y_{r-1} }{ dx} \right) = \frac{ T }{ m }\left( \frac{ (y_{r+1} - y_{r}) }{ dx } -\frac{ (y_{r}-y_{r-1}) }{ dx } \right)\] \[= \frac{ T }{ m } \left[ \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{r+1} - \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{r} \right] \] and \[\left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x+dx} - \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x} =\frac{ d^{2}y }{ dx^{2} } dx \] I'm a little bit confused by: \[\left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x+dx} - \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x} =\frac{ d^{2}y }{ dx^{2} } dx \] why \(\left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x+dx} - \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x} \) is equal to \(\frac{ d^{2}y }{ dx^{2} } dx\) ?????

    • one year ago
  24. Aperogalics Group Title
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    @gerryliyana it is simple just think practically let dy/dx=t then if i divide it by dx i.e. |dw:1355218737331:dw| then it is derivative :)

    • one year ago
  25. gerryliyana Group Title
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    what if it's second derivative???

    • one year ago
  26. Aperogalics Group Title
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    means???????

    • one year ago
  27. gerryliyana Group Title
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    If dy/dx = t shown by \[\frac{ t_{m+dm}-t_{m} }{ dm } \] how the form formula for second derivative?

    • one year ago
  28. Aperogalics Group Title
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    it would be |dw:1355219544429:dw| but t=dy/dm so |dw:1355219573174:dw|

    • one year ago
  29. Aperogalics Group Title
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    @gerryliyana

    • one year ago
  30. gerryliyana Group Title
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    |dw:1355219655154:dw|

    • one year ago
  31. Aperogalics Group Title
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    If dy/dx = t shown by tm+dm−tm/dm how the form formula for second derivative? in ur post @gerryliyana can you tell from where dm comes??????????

    • one year ago
  32. gerryliyana Group Title
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    ok ok i got it.., i'm sorry ..., hehe

    • one year ago
  33. Aperogalics Group Title
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    no prob. :)

    • one year ago
  34. gerryliyana Group Title
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    Ok, so \[y' = \lim_{dx \rightarrow 0} \frac{ y_{x+dx} - y_{x} }{ dx } \] and for second derivative \[y'' = \lim_{dx \rightarrow 0} \frac{ y'_{x+dx} - y'_{x} }{ dx }\] \[dx y''= y'_{x+dx} - y'_{x}\] \[dx \frac{ d^{2}y }{ dt^{2} } = \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right)_{x+dx} - \left( \frac{ dy }{ dx } \right) _{x}\] Ok??????

    • one year ago
  35. kr7210 Group Title
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    i'm sorry, a coupled oscillator have 2 degree of freedom coz of have two generalized coordinate to describe the system, sorry again.

    • one year ago
  36. gerryliyana Group Title
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    ok no problem @kr7210 thank you for coming :)

    • one year ago
  37. Aperogalics Group Title
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    @gerryliyana it's correct now :)

    • one year ago
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