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lvasquev462

Tell me about the Mayas, Incas and the Aztecs. What were some similarities? Differences?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. Swageraid32
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    i dont know do you want the shorter or longer version??

    • one year ago
  2. Swageraid32
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    here this might help more than the shorter version: Resolved Question: How are the Maya, Inca, and Aztec civilizations alike, and how are they different? How are they alike, and how are they different? thank you very much! I have added a couple of extra comments and observations and cut-and-pasted my original answer: Their architecture, style of dress, basic culture, religious practices, legends and mythologies (as we have observed with the Greek and Roman mythologies, the stories were essentially the same - only the characters' names were different), rituals, games, even their physical appearance as depicted in their artwork (the facial and cranial bone structures), etc., are all sufficiently similar to support speculations that all three sprang from the same roots. Also, they all built elaborate road systems, but none of them left any record of using the wheel. North American Indians were known to drag loads on stretcher-like conveyances, but no images of this are found among the Aztec, Mayan and Incan heiroglyphs. Whatever their common mode of transport may have been, they apparently all three shared THAT in common, too. The Aztecs were the best known of the lot for their bloody rituals of human sacrifice. Being the first of these pre-Columbian civilizations encountered by the Europeans (the Spanish Conquistadors), they were the first to be studied and documented by European standards. Only in recent decades, has study of the Mayans revealed that they, too, were a ritually bloodthirsty race. I have not heard or read anything about this sort of practice among the Incas, but due to the geographic remoteness of their civilization, they are probably the least-well-studied of them all. I would think that the main differences evolved from specialized needs created by the geography of the areas they settled in. The Aztecs (in northern Mexico) lived in a semi-desert-like area, the Mayans (in Central America) lived in jungles and the Inca (in the Andes of South America) built their civilization in high-altitude, heavily mountainous, regions. These different living conditions would have had both physical and cultural effects on each group. The Aztecs, in the semi-desert would have evolved to live on less water. Their basic food supply would probably have depended more on hunting than on agriculture. What agriculture they may have had, would probably have been only marginally successful - if that much. The Mayans, though, lived in lush jungles - where food should have been no problem. Their jungle-based lifestyle would probably have made for a very plant-rich diet. Like the Aztecs, they would be accustomed to heat, but would also be accustomed to a lot of moisture and humitity in their environment. Travel might have been more difficult through heavy jungle, so they might have moved around less, and been more of a home-based culture, or travelled mainly on inland waterways. The Incas, the ones we know the least about, seemed to find the hightest, most remote, hardest-to-reach places to settle. They had to be physically very strong to survive and lead active lives in such a thinned-out atmosphere. I have never read nor heard this, but logically, I would venture the guess that their lungs were probably slightly larger than those of their relatives further to the north. Even though their settlements were far apart, there is evidence of a lot of trading and interaction between them. The logisitcs of HOW this was managed, no one has ever explained in any material that I've read.

    • one year ago
  3. lvasquev462
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    the one with more information please

    • one year ago
  4. Swageraid32
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    just read through that and if need more help hmu

    • one year ago
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