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haleyking345

  • 3 years ago

How do you graph -cos (2x)? I am not sure.

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  1. luxiliu
    • 3 years ago
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    do you know what a normal cos graph looks like? Well, because you want a negative one, you would do it upside down. and since you want "2x", it will be squashed twice as much towards the y axis

  2. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    So, is the period still 2pie? And do you stay negative the whole way?

  3. petewe
    • 3 years ago
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    period is 2pi/k

  4. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1355613895882:dw|

  5. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    is that right?

  6. petewe
    • 3 years ago
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    thats -cosx, you haven't accounted for the 1/2 compression

  7. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1355614177155:dw|

  8. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1355614330835:dw|

  9. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    ok, so flip it upside down and that will give me y=-cos 2x?

  10. UnkleRhaukus
    • 3 years ago
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    thats right

  11. haleyking345
    • 3 years ago
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    k thank you

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