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TammyFlow

Does anyone now the table for the polar equation -6t(t is degree or radians)? No any helpful websites to help me get the table for this

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. richyw
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    what are you asking?

    • one year ago
  2. TammyFlow
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    I am asking for the table for the polar equation -6t

    • one year ago
  3. tkhunny
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    There is no such thing as "the table". This explains why you cannot find it. Can you provide more information? Is there a specific problem you are working on?

    • one year ago
  4. richyw
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    you want to make a table of cartesian coordinates for the polar function \(r(t)=-6t\) ?

    • one year ago
  5. TammyFlow
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    @richyw yes

    • one year ago
  6. tkhunny
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    Notice richyw's use of the phrase "a table". You can make a table on any values you like. This is why "the table" doesn't exist.

    • one year ago
  7. TammyFlow
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    Okay. So I am just basically looking for the coordinates of this equation

    • one year ago
  8. richyw
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    you could make a table of the polar coordinates. so for whatever angle t, you would have whatever radius r. or you could convert these coordinates to cartesian values, which would have x and y values being compared.

    • one year ago
  9. richyw
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    either way all you are doing is solving this equation for a few values.

    • one year ago
  10. TammyFlow
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    No I have polar graph paper and all i need is like the points.

    • one year ago
  11. richyw
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    ok I see. so then you just directly solve this. choose whatever values of t that you want and then you will get the r value directly from the equation

    • one year ago
  12. TammyFlow
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    Can you give me an example? If you don't mind

    • one year ago
  13. richyw
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    alright well the first point I would do would be at an angle of 0. so\[r(0)=-6(0)=0\] so you know that point will have angle 0 radius 0 (the origin)

    • one year ago
  14. richyw
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    how many points do you want?

    • one year ago
  15. TammyFlow
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    I am going by 30 degrees so until 360

    • one year ago
  16. richyw
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    are you sure this is in degrees? usually I would assume radians unless it specified.

    • one year ago
  17. TammyFlow
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    well radians will be find also

    • one year ago
  18. richyw
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    not that is makes a difference for the shape though

    • one year ago
  19. TammyFlow
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    I understand but I am just trying to graph it

    • one year ago
  20. richyw
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    ok well then go 30 degrees more (\(\pi/3\) radians) plug it in \(r(\pi/3)=-6(\pi/3)\) so \(r=-2\pi\)

    • one year ago
  21. richyw
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    then plug in \(2\pi/3\) etc until you reach \(2\pi\)

    • one year ago
  22. sirm3d
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    uhm, 30 degrees is \(\pi /6\)

    • one year ago
  23. richyw
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    haha oops yup

    • one year ago
  24. TammyFlow
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    Your fine you did 60 degrees

    • one year ago
  25. richyw
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    yup do what I said but every \(\pi/6\)

    • one year ago
  26. richyw
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    I make that mistake so often...

    • one year ago
  27. TammyFlow
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    It's fine we can't remember everything

    • one year ago
  28. richyw
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    what I would do if I was you is calculate \(2\pi\) first and then it will give you an idea of the scale you need to use for the graph. because it's going to be a spiral shaped thing

    • one year ago
  29. richyw
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    • one year ago
  30. TammyFlow
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    Yes I have a art math project I already drew my flower

    • one year ago
  31. TammyFlow
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    Hey can you convert that to radians because it will make my day much easier

    • one year ago
  32. richyw
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    that's already in radians

    • one year ago
  33. TammyFlow
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    it is

    • one year ago
  34. richyw
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    yes if it was in degrees you would have much larger values of r!

    • one year ago
  35. TammyFlow
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    yes that's true

    • one year ago
  36. richyw
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    I suppose if you wanted to see the radius scale in terms of fractions of pi I could open up octave. but you are gonna need to make the table of values anyways if that's what's required...

    • one year ago
  37. TammyFlow
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    it is

    • one year ago
  38. sirm3d
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    here's a graph of the polar equation \(r(t) = 6t\) in the interval \(0 \leq t \leq 2\pi\)

    • one year ago
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  39. TammyFlow
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    Thanks

    • one year ago
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