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Idealist

  • 3 years ago

A small spaceship whose mass is 1.5x10^3 kg (include-ing an astronaut) is drifting in outer space with negligible gravitational forces acting on it. If the astronaut turns on a 10 kW laser beam, what speed will the ship attain in 1.0 day because of the momentum carried away by the beam?

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  1. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    can u tell me the result option

  2. Idealist
    • 3 years ago
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    The answer is 1.9 mm/s.

  3. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    ok

  4. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    i m trying

  5. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    i got the result velocity is 759 m/s

  6. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    should i explain my procedure

  7. Idealist
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes, show me the work you did.

  8. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    ok i m showing

  9. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    let m= mass p=power t=time F=force s= distance

  10. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    v=final velocity

  11. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    a= acceleration

  12. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    Now\[P=\frac{ W }{ t }=\frac{ Fs }{ t }=F\frac{ s }{ t }=Fv\]

  13. Idealist
    • 3 years ago
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    What is the distance, s?

  14. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    \[or, 10000=Fv \]

  15. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    we know work= force* displacement or distaance

  16. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    or, \[F=10000/v\]

  17. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    now we know \[F=ma\]

  18. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    or, \[F=1500a\]

  19. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    or, \[10000/v=1500a\]

  20. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    r u getting my work

  21. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    or, \[a=10000/1500v\]

  22. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    now another law of motion is \[v=u+at=0+at=at=(10000/1500v) \times 24 \times 60 \times 60\]

  23. shamim
    • 3 years ago
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    now solve it for v

  24. Idealist
    • 3 years ago
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    Never mind. I found a formula for this problem, but thanks for the help.

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