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algebra2sucks

  • 3 years ago

Find the length of the hypotenuse. Show all work. HINT: Use the Pythagorean Theorem.

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  1. algebra2sucks
    • 3 years ago
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  2. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    @algebra2sucks Is it neccessary that you use the pythogras theorm :)

  3. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Well it is easy to use the Pythagoras theorm \[H^2=B^2+P^2\] Where, \[B=2\sqrt{3}\]\[P=\sqrt{3}\]

  4. algebra2sucks
    • 3 years ago
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    Yes i think it is @hba so what do i do

  5. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    Just put in the values and find H

  6. algebra2sucks
    • 3 years ago
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    We have to take it out of sqrt right? So it would be B = 2 1.7 P = 1.7???

  7. hba
    • 3 years ago
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    No i have shown you the formula just put in the values and solve it.

  8. algebra2sucks
    • 3 years ago
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    Im not sure how to do that

  9. precal
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1356291834762:dw|

  10. algebra2sucks
    • 3 years ago
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    thanks @precal

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