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tinaballerina

  • 3 years ago

Which is the equation to the line passing through points (2, -7) and (5, -1)?

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  1. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    y = 2x - 8 y = - 2x + 9 y = 2x - 11 y = - 2x + 6

  2. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    those are the answers.

  3. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    do u know how to find slope when 2 points are given ?

  4. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    No

  5. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    The slope of the line through points (x1,y1) and (x2,y2) is given by : \(\huge m=\frac{y_1-y_2}{x_1-x_2}\) now,just put the values and find m.

  6. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    could u find m=... ?

  7. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    No, im having a difficult time, i think its due to the early-ness. haha

  8. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    \(\huge m=\frac{y_1-y_2}{x_1-x_2}=\frac{-7-(-1)}{2-5}=...?\)

  9. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    -6/-3

  10. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    m= -6/-3 = ..... ?

  11. Kainui
    • 3 years ago
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    It might be easier if you have a graphing calculator. Make a line that looks like: y=(2/3)x and then change the slope around a bit to figure it out and see why the slope is rise/run by going to the "trace" option on your calculator and trying things out, like when x=3.

  12. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    2

  13. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    yes, m=2

  14. Compassionate
    • 3 years ago
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    Now use the first points given and the slope. Plug it into the equation: y - y1 = m(x - x1)

  15. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    now take any point, say (5,-1) and put it in y - y1 = m(x - x1)

  16. hartnn
    • 3 years ago
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    x1=5,m=2,y1=-1 isolate y

  17. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    -_-

  18. Compassionate
    • 3 years ago
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    Tina, let me make it easier for you. y - y1 = m(x - x1) y - (-1) = 2(x - 5) <-- Solve for y

  19. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    Good lord this is terrible. I feel so confused.

  20. Compassionate
    • 3 years ago
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    Okay. What are you confused with?

  21. tinaballerina
    • 3 years ago
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    Nothing. I think i'm going to skip this! I have to have it done by later tonight. I think im going to rest now haha thanks though:)

  22. Compassionate
    • 3 years ago
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    Bye.

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