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yrelhan4 Group Title

flux problem?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    |dw:1356550535697:dw| if a charge q is placed at the point M in the diagram, the flux caused through the sphere?

    • one year ago
  2. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    is the charge placed on the sphere?

    • one year ago
  3. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    point m is halfway between o and o1. o and o1 are on peripherry of ring and sphere respectively.. they are like in a strt line.. the sphere and the ring are symmetrical and o and o1 lie on the diameter..

    • one year ago
  4. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    answer is \[4q/3\]

    • one year ago
  5. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    3epsilon*

    • one year ago
  6. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    the flux in the sphere.. i'm sorry.. wanted to write something else. just messed up..

    • one year ago
  7. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    is it a metal sphere? because if it is, the flux through it is zero...

    • one year ago
  8. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    i dont think it is.. the answer is not zero.. so its not..

    • one year ago
  9. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    but still, the charge is outside the sphere, isn't it? so q(enclosed)=0. And therefore, the flux though the sphere is zero.

    • one year ago
  10. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    no it isnt outside the sphere.. its at M..

    • one year ago
  11. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    yeah....i'm not getting the picture here...

    • one year ago
  12. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    |dw:1356553072695:dw| if you look at the arrangement from the side, is this how it'd look?

    • one year ago
  13. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    no.. they are in the same plane.. intersecting at two points..

    • one year ago
  14. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    should i post a pic from the book?

    • one year ago
  15. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    Ahhh now i see it, thanks.

    • one year ago
  16. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    just reply if you get it.. i'm going off for now.. i have a similar problem if that would help you.. suppose if the charge is placed uniformly on the ring.. then the part with the sphere is only q/3.. so the flux there wuld be q/3epsilon.. i dont think its of any help.. just in case..

    • one year ago
  17. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    i think it'd be great if you could post the pic..

    • one year ago
  18. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    just a minute..

    • one year ago
  19. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    • one year ago
  20. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    try it, and tell me you get it..

    • one year ago
  21. rajathsbhat Group Title
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    i think the question is flawed. Here's why: the only way you can end up with an answer of \(\Large \frac{4q}{3\epsilon_0}\) is if there's a charge of +q/3 on the ring. [That makes q(enclosed) = q + (q/3) = 4q/3 and so the flux turns out to be \(\large \frac{4q}{3\epsilon_0}\).] But that's not what happens, When you place that positive charge (+q) there, the part of the ring on the inside of the sphere becomes negatively charged and the part outside becomes positively charged (Of course, here I'm assuming that the ring and the sphere are not touching each other). So, the net charge inside the sphere is \( \text{q-(something)}\), which is obviously less than \(\Large \frac{4q}{3}\).

    • one year ago
  22. yrelhan4 Group Title
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    hmm.. i seem to be getting your point.. thank you!!

    • one year ago
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