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corey1234

  • 3 years ago

For the function f(x)==2x, I get why the inverse function is f^-1(y)==y/2, but why is it ok to write it equivalently as f^-1(x)==x/2? x and y are specific objects, in this case y ==2x and x==y/2. So x and y are not equal. I do not get why you can just interchange them?

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  1. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_variables_and_bound_variables

  2. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    When a variable is used as a function input, it becomes a place holder for the sake of substitution.

  3. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Saying that \( f(x) = x^2 \) and \( f(y) = y^2 \) isn't saying that \( x = y \).

  4. mathstudent55
    • 3 years ago
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    f(x) = 2x is the same as y = 2x To find the inverse, swap x and y and solve for y x = 2y, so y = x/2 f(x) = 2x; f^-1(x) = x/2 What this means is that when you use a number as x, or input, in f(x), you get a value. If you then enter that value as input into f^-1(x), you get back the original x that you had entered as input into f(x). That is what the inverse of a function does. It reverses the mapping that the function did. f(x) is a different function from f^-1(x). You could call the inverse function g(x), but that would not readily show that they are inverses. f^-1(x) is just a convenient notation to emphasise that it's the inverse of f(x).

  5. corey1234
    • 3 years ago
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    I still do not understand. If f(x)=x and f(y)=y, then doesn't that mean that x=y?

  6. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    No, it doesn't. A function is a mapping. It takes and input and gives you an output. When we write a function, we need a placeholder for the input. We can use anything we want as the input placeholder.

  7. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    If you know for a fact that \(y = 2x\), for example, then you know \(f(y) \neq f(x)\). Rather, \(f(y) = f(2x)\).

  8. wio
    • 3 years ago
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    Note: Unless \(x = 0\), because \(y = 2(0) = 0 = x\).

  9. corey1234
    • 3 years ago
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    Ok thank you.

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