anonymous
  • anonymous
Find all zeros 5x^5-20x^4-40x^3-16x^2-45x+180=0
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@zepp
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do you mean by "Find all zeros" ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
find the zeros of th eq

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
Use rational root theorem to find first zero. Then use synthetic division to factor it out.
anonymous
  • anonymous
hi @evy15 are you in numerical analysis? the root are -2.07316, 1.2355, 5.5573 and two complex roots check it for yourself if they are true
anonymous
  • anonymous
@evy though the equation is 5x^5-20x^4-40x^3-16x^2-45x+180=0 correct bu t may be i feel u have typed in -16X^2 instead of 160x^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
no its correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
can someone please help me and explain to me how to begin this problem
anonymous
  • anonymous
can someone respond
mathmate
  • mathmate
Have you done numerical methods in your course? This is not a problem that can be solved by factorization, or rearrangements. I suggest you triple check the question.
anonymous
  • anonymous
its correct can you tell me how to begin
mathmate
  • mathmate
It can be solved numerically, or graphically. Are these expected methods to use in your course?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes the thing is i missed a day in class and now i dont know how to work this out
mathmate
  • mathmate
Are you working on factorization, Descartes rule of signs, etc.? I suggest you check your course outline to see what you're expected to know, or check with a friend to see what has been done that day. The prof would also be pleased to tell you what has been covered that day. This problem requires numerical methods which are techniques completely different from your previous problems.
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u help me and explain it to me
anonymous
  • anonymous
i have tried to use the book but i keep getting it wrong
mathmate
  • mathmate
What is the name of your math course?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Algebra 2
mathmate
  • mathmate
Then there is probably another typo in the question.
anonymous
  • anonymous
there isn't, i already checked
mathmate
  • mathmate
I believe you, but your prof made a typo! Check in the index of your textbook to see if Newton's method is in there. What is the title of your textbook?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
Im not sure, hold on
anonymous
  • anonymous
Holt McDougal Larson Algebra 2
mathmate
  • mathmate
Can you find "Newton's method" in the index?
mathmate
  • mathmate
On which chapter are you working?
mathmate
  • mathmate
Is it paper home-work or online?
anonymous
  • anonymous
its a take home test and i couldnt find it
mathmate
  • mathmate
As matricked pointed out, IF -16x^2 had been +160x^2, then there are rational roots obtainable by grouping. 5x^5-20x^4-40x^3+160x^2-45x+180 =5(x^5-4x^4-8x^3+32x^2-9x+36) \(= 5( x^4(x-4) -8x^2(x-4) -9(x-4)) \) \(= 5(x-4)(x^4-8x^2-9) \) \(= 5(x-4)(x^2-9)(x^2+1) \) \(= 5(x-4)(x+3)(x-3)(x^+1) \)
mathmate
  • mathmate
*last factor is \( (x^2+1) \)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok do you solve for them now
anonymous
  • anonymous
hold on a second, im sorry

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