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shubhamsrg

law of conservation of sum of digits is what i call it.. how do i prove it but ?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. shubhamsrg
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    whenever you multiply or add ANY 2 numbers, sum of digits on LHS always = sum of digits on RHS you may verify.. lets say 119 * 322 = 38318 sum of respective digits on LHS = (11) * (7) => 77 => 14 => 5 and on RHS , 3+8+3+1+8 = 23 => 5 note : for (11)*(7) , we can also treat it as (2)*(7) = 14=>5 sum of digits do not change ..

    • one year ago
  2. shubhamsrg
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    same is true for addition 119 + 322 = 441 11 + 7 = 18 =>9 on LHS 4+4+1 =9 on RHS how do i prove that sum of digits is always conserved ?

    • one year ago
  3. shubhamsrg
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    not 2 numbers infact,,any quantity of numbers you add or multiply, SUM remains conserved. by any quantity means you may take as many numbers you want on LHS..

    • one year ago
  4. joemath314159
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    youre reducing the sum modulo 9 right? thats why you took 77 and brought it down to 5?

    • one year ago
  5. shubhamsrg
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    yes..

    • one year ago
  6. joemath314159
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    Then the reason is because we usually have our numbers in base 10. Say you have the 5 digit number 54321. This is really:\[5(10)^4+4(10)^3+3(10)^2+2(10)+1\]If you reduce 10 modulo 9, they become ones. So mod 9 we have:\[5(10)^4+4(10)^3+3(10)^2+2(10)+1\equiv 5(1)^4+4(1)^3+3(1)^2+2(1)+1\] \[=5+4+3+2+1\]So remainders when dividing by 9 are preserved in the digits.

    • one year ago
  7. joemath314159
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    This is called, Casting Out Nines by some.

    • one year ago
  8. hartnn
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    *

    • one year ago
  9. shubhamsrg
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    how do you apply the fact during multiplication ?

    • one year ago
  10. joemath314159
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    Depending on what lvl of math you have seen, that can be a rough question or an easy one. The short answer is that the act of taking an integer an looking at its remainder when you divide by nine is a ring homomorphism from\[\mathbb{Z}\rightarrow \mathbb{Z}_9\]the integers modulo 9. A ring homomorphism is a function that preserves the operations of the ring, the addition and multiplication. So for all integers x, y:\[f(x+y)=f(x)+f(y), f(x\cdot y)=f(x)\cdot f(y)\]

    • one year ago
  11. joemath314159
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    If some of those terms are a little fuzzy, to understand why, you would have to multiply two numbers in the base 10 expanded form and check out whats happening.

    • one year ago
  12. shubhamsrg
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    hmm,,surely i'd love to research on that,,give me some time,,i'll get back to you..

    • one year ago
  13. shubhamsrg
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    sorry for my late reply..but OS was down for quite a long time today.. as you told , and rightly so, i worked on reducing to modulo 9. here is my progress: a * b = c let a = (9m + n) b = (9s + t) c =(9p + q) on that substitution , we are reduced to 9h + mn = q for some number h now what do i do next.. m,n,q are all single digits

    • one year ago
  14. shubhamsrg
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    sire ? @joemath314159

    • one year ago
  15. binarymimic
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    when you multiply two numbers, the sum of the digits on the lhs is equal to the sum of the digits on the rhs? that does not seem intuitive but always seems to work. is this a property of integers, or any rational numbers with finite decimal representations ?

    • one year ago
  16. binarymimic
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    i guess theres not a difference is there?

    • one year ago
  17. sauravshakya
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    I guess at first we need to prove that a number is divisible by 3 only if its sum of digits is divisible by 3

    • one year ago
  18. shubhamsrg
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    why you take 3? we rightly took 9 and this fact can be easily proven suppose we have 100a+ 10b + c =>9 q + a+b+c i.e. whole no. is divisible by 9 if sum of digits is divisible by 9 am just stuck at proving sum of digits remain conserved in 9h + mn = q for some number h now what do i do next.. m,n,q are all single digits as in my last comment..

    • one year ago
  19. T0mmy
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    Conserve the digits don't get thee fingers cut off. Euler 1781

    • one year ago
  20. shubhamsrg
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    @mukushla

    • one year ago
  21. shubhamsrg
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    @ganeshie8

    • one year ago
  22. shubhamsrg
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    ohh..got it! multiplication, is nothing but just addition ! :O on that note, everything seems so simplified.. gotcha.. hmm..

    • one year ago
  23. yrelhan4
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    *

    • one year ago
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