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tpenn

  • 3 years ago

Factor: x^3-9x

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  1. anonymous
    • 3 years ago
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    \[x(x^2-9)\] is a start. then factor the \(x^2-9\) part as the difference of two squares

  2. tpenn
    • 3 years ago
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    wait im confused, can you show work?

  3. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    He just took out an x

  4. tpenn
    • 3 years ago
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    so x(x^2-9) is the answer?

  5. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    \[x^3-9x\] x is common to both sides

  6. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    so then \[x(x^2-9)\]

  7. tpenn
    • 3 years ago
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    ohh okay

  8. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    But \[x^2-9 is factorable\]

  9. tpenn
    • 3 years ago
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    how do you factor x^2-9 though?

  10. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    Use the rule of a difference of two squares.

  11. hawkfalcon
    • 3 years ago
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    \[(x+3)(x-3)\]

  12. tpenn
    • 3 years ago
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    oh okay i understand, i was just confused at how you were explaining it, thanks

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