Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Rachel98 Group Title

What are some differences in Vascular Systems of early plants, such as ferns and Angiosperms? How are their Vascular Systems different from each other?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. kasim17 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Around 400 million years ago, in the Silurian Era, the first plants appeared on land. Most similar to what are known today as Bryophytes, they descended from early water dwelling alga. They lacked vascular (circulatory) systems and complex physical characteristics, but their appearance marked a great step in the development of Earth. The world they populated was far different from that which we enjoy today: rocky, exposed and barren, with no sign of the rich and diverse life which was to later make our planet so unique. Only the oceans, from which the first plants came, teemed with organisms. As time passed, the environment caused the first plants to change and modify their structures to be able to meet their life needs. Further impetus for evolution arrived with the first terrestrial animals, as the first links in the great chain of animal-plant codependence were forged. With change came specialization and increasing complexity in structure, and it is based upon these characteristics that plants are classified or "ranked" today in the study of phylogenetics. Classification begins with comparing the primitive features of the earliest terrestrial plants to those of other plants. In this method, we can organize terrestrial plants into the following basic divisions, in order of increasing development: Bryophyta, Pteridophyta (ferns and fern allies), gymnosperms (Cycadophyta, Ginkgophyta, Coniferophyta, and Gnetophyta), and angiosperms (Anthophyta, divided into dicots and monocots). In this tour, we will explore the evolution of the unique kingdom Plantae's terrestrial members. To make matters simpler, we will focus mainly on comparing the reproductive characteristics of each group. Other features also serve to illustrate the evolutionary relationships, but the reproductive differences are vivid and clear markers of the progression of terrestrial plant advancement. As you proceed, consider the increasing complexity of the plants as we progress from the most primitive Bryophytes to the most modern angiosperms. Most of all, enjoy yourself as you delve into the wonderful and fascinating world of plants.

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.