Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

jennychan12

  • one year ago

AP Calculus AB 2003 #2 http://www.collegeboard.com/prod_downloads/ap/students/calculus/calculus_ab_frq_03.pdf I don't understand how to do part c).

  • This Question is Closed
  1. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    total distance is integral of velocity but u gotta take into consideration which way it's going

  2. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I looked at the sample respoinses and they did like absolute value of v(t). But I don't understand why. http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/ap03_calculusab_q2_27980.pdf

  3. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so you found where it changes direction right?

  4. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    the thing is...|dw:1357322365854:dw|

  5. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if u take just the integral, the area on the bottom gets subtracted

  6. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    but that's for displacement. So if u want to get the distance you need to add that area instead of subtracting it.. So you have to integrate from start till when it changed direction, then from when it changed direction till when it changed direction again, etc.. and finally take the absolute value of all integrals and add them up

  7. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    |dw:1357322510296:dw| see if u start at pt A, displacement, which is the regular integral, is 0, but distance traveled, is 5

  8. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i thought to find the distance u have to take integral of the velocity.

  9. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    yes you do.. integral of velocity is indeed the area under the velocity curve, which is the displacement

  10. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so in order to get the DISTANCE.. you want to add all the areas that end up below y- axis, instead of subtracting them

  11. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    if you were looking for DISPLACEMENT, you would just take the integral of that function from 0 to 3. But, since you're looking for DISTANCE, take the integral of that function from 0 to a, where a is the time at which particle changed direction.

  12. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    okay listen, where did the particle change direction?

  13. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    rad(2pi) and 0

  14. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    0?

  15. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah those were the solutions but only rad(2pi) works

  16. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    no it was just t = 2.507

  17. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yeah that's rad(2pi)

  18. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    so integrate that function from 0 to 2.507, then from 2.507 to 3

  19. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    once you get the results, say Int from 0 to 2.507 = A, and Int from 2.507 to 3 = B; just add up the absolute values: |A| + |B|

  20. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    that's all he's doing by integrating the absolute value of V over 0 < t < 3

  21. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    how'd u integrate the function tho? like algebraically?

  22. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    isn't that the calculator part?

  23. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    i dont think u can integrate exponents inside trig functions yet.. lol

  24. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    or do u just plug it into the graphing calculator? ohhh -_- ok.

  25. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    i mean i dont think there is a way that anyone has found how to do that

  26. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    lol yea

  27. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ohhh yeah i got the answer when i plugged it into the calculator

  28. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    You mean to tell me.... I WASTED MY TIME???!!!!!!

  29. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    nooooooo...... like after you told me all that...

  30. bahrom7893
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 2

    k good lol

  31. jennychan12
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    sorry..if anyone's still viewing this for part d) why did they add 1 to rad(2pi) ?

  32. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    Search OpenStudy
    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.