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pavankumartgpk

  • 2 years ago

I am just not able to understand this ice in the water question.If an ice cube is floating on water,when it melts apparently the water level stays the same.But doesn't the volume decrease?Because when ice melts it doesn't completely cover the hole it created since it doesnt give as much water as water is denser.

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  1. AravindG
    • 2 years ago
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    The ice cube displaces its own weight in the underlying water and the water level remains constant when the ice melts, because the melting process replaces the water which has already been displaced by the ice. This effect is known as Archimedes’ principle.The principle refers to weight and not volume. Think this way: piece of ice displaced water. Mass of the displaced water was identical with the mass of ice. When the ice melts, mass of the water from melting doesn't change. What changes is the volume - but the volume of the water from melted ice is identical to the volume displaced (why? because it is water, so one from melting has exactly the same density as the one displaced). So you have removed some volume and then you have added identical volume - and total volume didn't change. I hope that removes all your doubts :)

  2. andrefontex
    • 2 years ago
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    @AravindG what you are saying , is that the volume of ice below the water line it's equal to the volume of the water melted?

  3. AravindG
    • 2 years ago
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    @andrefontex the volume of the water from melted ice is identical to the volume displaced

  4. andrefontex
    • 2 years ago
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    so , the volume displaced is equal to the volume of the ice under water lol, i understand now why icebergs parts are higher under the water, then outside

  5. AravindG
    • 2 years ago
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    yep :)

  6. ANAND1298
    • 2 years ago
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    It depends on the amount of water . Lets say there is very less amount of water and ice cube is left to melt . The water level will decrease after the ice cube melts. It is because the water will cool as the ice melts and as we know that cold water is more dense than hot water. It could be explained by the fact that the water shrinks as it cools. But if there is a lot of water such that the cooling of water as ice melts doesn't matters more then the water level will not rise because the amount of water displaced by the ice cube is equal to the weight of the ice cube . So the level of water doesn't rises.

  7. rva.raghav
    • 2 years ago
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    can anyone tell me about otto cycle

  8. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    Well, it's sometimes good to copy and paste answers like AravindG did, hence plagiarizing. :-) http://www.skepticalscience.com/print.php?n=1019

  9. ParthKohli
    • 2 years ago
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    Isn't it?

  10. rva.raghav
    • 2 years ago
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    parthkohli can you tell me about otto cycle,diesel cycle

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