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pavankumartgpk

  • one year ago

I am just not able to understand this ice in the water question.If an ice cube is floating on water,when it melts apparently the water level stays the same.But doesn't the volume decrease?Because when ice melts it doesn't completely cover the hole it created since it doesnt give as much water as water is denser.

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  1. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    can you phrase that as a question

  2. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Why does water level stay the same when the ice cube floating in water melts?

  3. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    aha interesting question!!!.. let me answer it this way i ll use drawing!

  4. UnkleRhaukus
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1357977517632:dw|

  5. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Okay but now when the submerged part melts the water we get from that doesnt completely cover the volume right?

  6. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1357977591413:dw| in the two drawings.. the extra water volume is equivalent to how much MASS is.. cause density remains the same.. fine when ice floats.. the bouyant force is exactly equal to the weight of the ice... and the bouyant force = weight of water displaced.. hence the shaded portion of water has the same mass as the ice.. volume =- mass(ice)/density(water) when the ice melts... it becomes water... but it has the same mass as it was when it was ice.. (it has to be.. mass can't disappear when things change state).. hence the volume of that portion (shaded in 3rd diagram) = mass(ice)/density(water) ... (why density of water??.. cause now the ice has become water.. ).. hence you see in both cases the additional volume (shaded portion is the same)

  7. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    i put the negative sign by mistake! :-/

  8. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Ok ill try to understand that.Sec

  9. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Okay yeah,Got it thanx!

  10. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    lets see if you got it.. what would happen if ice was floating on MERCURY!? .. (which is way denser than water?).. after the ice would melt.. would the final level be more or less or same?

  11. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    And there are additional question i like you to think about?? what happens to the level of water.. when anchor from boat is throw into water?

  12. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    hmm lets see,now volume would increase.Because initially the volume would be lesser than after melting as volume of water after melting would be lesser than before.Correct?

  13. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Sorry I meant density of water after melting would be lesser than mercury

  14. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    no that doesn't matter.. don't think about the fact that ice takes up less volume than water!!...

  15. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    but yes.. since density of water is lesser than mercury.. the level of water would be way way higher!!.. :)

  16. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    Yeah now when the anchor is thrown in water the water level would go down as it displaces more water when in boat right?

  17. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    precisely!!..

  18. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    i have nothing more to teach you *tears* :D

  19. pavankumartgpk
    • one year ago
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    :D Thanx a lot man.Was thinking over it for 2 hours.Finally got it

  20. Mashy
    • one year ago
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    no problem ;-)!

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