anonymous
  • anonymous
How would you graph [6,14]?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
If you are only graphing it with no other equations, you would just go over 6 ( the x-coordinate) and up 14 the (y-coordinate)
anonymous
  • anonymous
as [6,
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't know what you are saying, sorry.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
*[6,14] being a interval notation.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok. I thought they were just parenthesis sorry:) Is that the number line that that you put a closed or open dot on and the arrow pointing a certain way?
anonymous
  • anonymous
would the graph be going left or right and would it be opened or closed circle?
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I have only seen it 6
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
when you have [: closed circle on the left, ]: closed circle on the right If you had like (6,14) then it means open circle on the left, open circle on the right If you had lik (6,14]: open right on the left, closed circle on the right Your book might use ]6,14[ instead of (6,14) as notation (but I have rarely seen this)
anonymous
  • anonymous
That is interesting I have never seen it done like that. With the parenthesis representing closed or open circles and all..
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
If you had like (6,14]: open circle on the left, closed circle on the right***
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
Oh it's actually really common notation. What year are you in @Emah ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am a tenth grader
anonymous
  • anonymous
@kirbykirby what grade/year are you in?
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
Hmm ok. Well maybe it differs where you're from. We saw this notation by then. But oh well if you take more math courses you will surely see this notation. Probably in calceulus... and definitely in university math courses :)
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
I'm a second year math major in university
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah I have only seen it the way I said before. It's the same end result, just a different way of getting it. Have you seen it 6
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ah okay. Yeah, this stuff is in University. I don't think high schools in my country have any textbooks/teachers teaching students this way.
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
Hm interesting. My teacher introduced intervals this way in our grade 9 o.o But yeah I suppose it depends where you're from lol. Yes @Emah, you see this way as well and it's also very common :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok gotcha...
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
Although it would be more specifically be \[6\le14\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Our country's on decline when it comes to the educational standard of mathematics. I'm in Australia. We're now at rank 20th+ when it comes to maths standard.
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
oops \[6\le x \le14\]**
kirbykirby
  • kirbykirby
Well it's really just notation, it's not that big of a deal :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
So is mine.. haha i'm from America. That's super cool that your from Australia, I have always wanted to go there:P
anonymous
  • anonymous
K this kid is probably getting annoyed so I'm gonna go...
anonymous
  • anonymous
Go to Australia with Ellen. I heard she's taking a select group to Australia for free.

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