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AngelicDragon

  • 3 years ago

We never learned this!!! I'll give a medal to whoever can help me!!! I've read and re-read my lessons like 7 times it's not there! The paths of the light waves that interfere to cause first-order lines A. differ in length by the wavelength of the light. B. are parallel lines. C. are the same length. D. differ in length by one-half of the wavelength of the light.

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  1. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    @Mashy Help Me!!! *Insert Anime crying* ='(

  2. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    well anyone works but still

  3. Mashy
    • 3 years ago
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    you need to know what causes those bright and dark fringes in interference.. can you tell me why you get interference in the first place?

  4. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    the interference occurs when waves either cancel each other out or reinforce each other

  5. Mashy
    • 3 years ago
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    and when do they reinforce each other? i mean what condition?

  6. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    Two coherent waves traveling along two different paths to the same point will interfere destructively if there is a difference in distance traveled that is equivalent to a half number of wavelengths. And two coherent waves traveling along two different paths to the same point will interfere constructively if there is a difference in distance traveled that is equivalent to a whole number of wavelengths.

  7. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    I that out of this site: http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/light/U12l3e.cfm (My lessons aren't that specific)

  8. Mashy
    • 3 years ago
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    there you go.. so now try to answer the questoin :P

  9. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    So it would be A

  10. Mashy
    • 3 years ago
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    what about C/?? why can't C be the answer?

  11. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    oh yeah. oops

  12. Mashy
    • 3 years ago
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    no .. answer me.. think !!

  13. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    A little pushy aren't we? Okay. Fine. It COULD be C but if they were the same length then they would most likely cancel each other out. (I've learned for several years in a row that usually when something(s) are the same in measurement they tend to cancel each other out.)

  14. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    So I still wanna stick with A even though I'm still considering C as a small possibility

  15. AngelicDragon
    • 3 years ago
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    Are you still there @Mashy ?

  16. Shames
    • 3 years ago
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    A. differ in length by the wavelength of the light.

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