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HaileyroX!

  • 3 years ago

The measure of <3 is 101º. Find the measure of <4. A) 79° B) 106° C) 74° D) 101° image in comments below!

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  1. HaileyroX!
    • 3 years ago
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  2. Nikhil619
    • 3 years ago
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    do u know what a linear pair is?

  3. HaileyroX!
    • 3 years ago
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    The two supplementary adjacent angles formed by two intersecting lines

  4. Nikhil619
    • 3 years ago
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    @HaileyroX! yeah..gud so use that!

  5. HaileyroX!
    • 3 years ago
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    I thought all the angles would have to be 280 all together but it would be too much! so maybe it has to go to 560?

  6. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    3 and 4 form a linear pair.Use that idea to get 4

  7. HaileyroX!
    • 3 years ago
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    i dont think i understand linear pair that well

  8. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    linear pair is any two angles that add upto 180 degree

  9. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1358520408219:dw|

  10. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    take a look at the diagram, her A and B form a linear pair so A=180-B B=180-A And A+B=180

  11. HaileyroX!
    • 3 years ago
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    i dont know

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