Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

seidi.yamauti

  • 2 years ago

I wrote it in MIT's 8.01[OCW - Physics] subject, but seems that there are not much movement.. At the end of lecture 12, Prof. Walter Lewin asks if the time for an object that is launched from ground zero with an angle != 0 to reach the maximun altitude (point P) is the same as it to land from there to y=0. Considering air drag. Shall we discuss it?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Outkast3r09
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    At the highest point of altitude what is your velocity?

  2. Outkast3r09
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Velocity in the y direction that is

  3. Outkast3r09
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and think about what variable are in air drag

  4. Mashy
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I think considering that the drag constant b doesn't change !

  5. seidi.yamauti
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9lvNofoUYwI&list=PLF688ECB2FF119649 This is the lecture. The problem is given at the last seconds. Sure the velocity is zero at the highest point, and since we can disconsider the velocity in x axis (?), the only thing that is to be analized is the motion in y axis. I am to say yes, both times are the same, but i wouldn't be surprised if considering drag force could change the asnwer. The viscosity/pressure regime's influency in the motion is quite confuse for me to understand. Moreover, the considered object is a sphere (for simplicity), and just to say, the whole question may have been caused because i'm not so good in english haha. http://ocw.mit.edu//courses/physics/8-01-physics-i-classical-mechanics-fall-1999/lecture-notes/sup5_1.pdf

  6. Diwakar
    • 2 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    As the object moves up both g and air drag act downward and hence the retardation is "more" than g. When it comes down g is downwards but air drag is upwards. Hence acceleration is "less" than g. Since vertical distance to be covered is same in both the cases, it will take more time to come down than to go up.

  7. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.