Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

sarah_hendrix7

  • 3 years ago

Please help??

  • This Question is Closed
  1. sarah_hendrix7
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

  2. shubhamsrg
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How comfortable are you with eqns of motion ?

  3. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Did you figure out your question?

  4. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    please post this in physics group

  5. Outkast3r09
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what is the problem? A lot of problems assigned to mathematics classes are actually simple physics problem

  6. PhoenixFire
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @sarah_hendrix7 Do you still need help?

  7. sarah_hendrix7
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @PheonixFire If you're willing, I'd love some help.

  8. binarymimic
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what do you know about an object in freefall? what equation governs its trajectory? in this case it's a single dimensional trajectory. think of the acceleration due to gravity.

  9. PhoenixFire
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Use the equation \[x_f=x_o+v_ot+{1 \over 2}at^2\] Xf is final position Xo initial position Vo initial velocity a acceleration (in this case just gravity) t time For your problem you can set Xo=0, Vo=0. plug in the rest and you'll know how far the object has fallen after time of 1.1 sec. I know this equation is not really needed because the values get set to 0 so here's the shorter version people tend to remember more: \[h={1 \over 2}at^2\]Now you know for reference where this equation is from.

  10. PhoenixFire
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    For question (b) take the first equation I gave you and rearrange for Vo. plug in the values and you should get the answer.

  11. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy