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zeig_101

*reward: 1 medal for answers* 1) If the current in a wire is at 0.5 A and the voltage is measured at 100 volts, what is the resistance in the wire? 2)What is the electric power used by an appliance if the current is 2 A and the voltage is 50 volts? 3)How are sound waves produced, and what impacts do different types of matter have on the speed of the wave? 4)What is the electromagnetic spectrum? Explain and give an example. 5)http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/6528/459431120201182932am187.png In the figure shown, how could you determine the wavelength? 6)Explain how you can quickly determine whether a string of lights is wired in series or in parallel.

  • one year ago
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  1. inkyvoyd
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    Ohm's law: I=V/R

    • one year ago
  2. zeig_101
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    See, I dont know how to use Ohm's law

    • one year ago
  3. inkyvoyd
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    For number one, I=0.5 and V=100

    • one year ago
  4. inkyvoyd
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    so you just back substitute the numbers in: (0.5)=100/R Next you isolate R. 0.5R=100 R=200

    • one year ago
  5. zeig_101
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    ok, so, .5 A=100V/X?

    • one year ago
  6. inkyvoyd
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    yup

    • one year ago
  7. zeig_101
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    so, 50a=x?

    • one year ago
  8. inkyvoyd
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    no. A is a unit.

    • one year ago
  9. inkyvoyd
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    It's not a variable. If it helps you, use Amps instead of A

    • one year ago
  10. zeig_101
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    Ok, I don't get this can you walk me through it?

    • one year ago
  11. inkyvoyd
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    Okay. We know that I=V/R. We also know that I=0.5Amps and V=100Volts Do you follow?

    • one year ago
  12. zeig_101
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    What do the things in I=V/r mean?

    • one year ago
  13. inkyvoyd
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    It's a relationship between current, voltage, and resistance. I is a variable that represents current. V is a variable that represents voltage. R is a variable that represents resistance. We usually give these measurements in Amperes (A), Volts (V) and Ohms (omega), respectively.

    • one year ago
  14. zeig_101
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    ok, so its really C=V/R?

    • one year ago
  15. inkyvoyd
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    We don't use C for current. We use I. This is out of habit, so use I okay?

    • one year ago
  16. zeig_101
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    ok

    • one year ago
  17. inkyvoyd
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    (In mathematics we often encounter constants and we represent them with C's. If we used C for current it would be confused with other values and would not be clear). BUt essentially yes, the relationship is I=V/R

    • one year ago
  18. zeig_101
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    ok

    • one year ago
  19. zeig_101
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    so 0.5=100/R

    • one year ago
  20. inkyvoyd
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    yes.

    • one year ago
  21. zeig_101
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    now where do i go from there?

    • one year ago
  22. inkyvoyd
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    Multiply both sides by R.

    • one year ago
  23. zeig_101
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    so,0.5R=100?

    • one year ago
  24. inkyvoyd
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    Yup.

    • one year ago
  25. zeig_101
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    ok, so divide by .5?

    • one year ago
  26. zeig_101
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    R=100/0.5 R=200

    • one year ago
  27. inkyvoyd
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    Yes.

    • one year ago
  28. inkyvoyd
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    Can you do number 2?

    • one year ago
  29. zeig_101
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    What is the electric power used by an appliance if the current is 2 A and the voltage is 50 volts? I=V/r 2=50/r 2r=50 r=100?

    • one year ago
  30. inkyvoyd
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    btw, the units for the resistance are in ohms.

    • one year ago
  31. inkyvoyd
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    no, power is P=IV x.x

    • one year ago
  32. inkyvoyd
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    sorry they are different formulas.

    • one year ago
  33. zeig_101
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    What is the electric power used by an appliance if the current is 2 A and the voltage is 50 volts? P=I*V? P=2A*50V P=100?

    • one year ago
  34. inkyvoyd
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    100 watts

    • one year ago
  35. zeig_101
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    ok

    • one year ago
  36. inkyvoyd
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    Do you need help with the rest?

    • one year ago
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