anonymous
  • anonymous
anyone good with modern physics?
Physics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
shoot the question buddy
anonymous
  • anonymous
Certain toys found in cereal boxes display the phenomenon of phosphorescence. If a child exposes the toy to a bright light (for example, the Sun), then the toy will glow with a characteristic color when the child takes it into a dark closet. The phenomenon of phosphorescence requires the interaction of light with three energy levels in an atom (or molecule). The figure below shows a hypothetical energy diagram in which the lowest state shown is the ground state (E = 0). When the toy is taken into the Sun, a photon causes a transition from the ground state to state 2. Almost immediately, the atom emits a photon, making a fast transition to state 1. The atom makes a transition to the ground state only slowly. Thus when the child takes the toy into a closet, he/she is able to observe the phosphorescent photons from this final transition. The transition from state 1 to the ground state is said to be forbidden, it takes place by a different (and thus slower) process than the other transitions. Let fabs be the frequency of the absorbed photons, ffl be the frequency of the photons emitted while the object is still in the sunlight, and fph be the frequency of the photons released in the closet. (Planck’s constant is h = 4.14×10-15 eV.s.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
How does fabs compare to fph?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
http://recent-science.com/index.php/rrst/article/viewfile/14865/7567
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats the hole model
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's a research paper, not sure if it will help me with my hw
anonymous
  • anonymous
If the frequency of the incoming light is great enough, there should be enough energy to break off the electron and have some left over to give it some kinetic energy. So… h f = Ek max + W
anonymous
  • anonymous
W = work function (J or eV) h = Planck’s constant fo = threshold frequency (Hz)

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