Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

lklkl;k;lk;k

anyone good with modern physics?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

  • This Question is Open
  1. Mashy
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    shoot the question buddy

    • one year ago
  2. lklkl;k;lk;k
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Certain toys found in cereal boxes display the phenomenon of phosphorescence. If a child exposes the toy to a bright light (for example, the Sun), then the toy will glow with a characteristic color when the child takes it into a dark closet. The phenomenon of phosphorescence requires the interaction of light with three energy levels in an atom (or molecule). The figure below shows a hypothetical energy diagram in which the lowest state shown is the ground state (E = 0). When the toy is taken into the Sun, a photon causes a transition from the ground state to state 2. Almost immediately, the atom emits a photon, making a fast transition to state 1. The atom makes a transition to the ground state only slowly. Thus when the child takes the toy into a closet, he/she is able to observe the phosphorescent photons from this final transition. The transition from state 1 to the ground state is said to be forbidden, it takes place by a different (and thus slower) process than the other transitions. Let fabs be the frequency of the absorbed photons, ffl be the frequency of the photons emitted while the object is still in the sunlight, and fph be the frequency of the photons released in the closet. (Planck’s constant is h = 4.14×10-15 eV.s.)

    • one year ago
  3. lklkl;k;lk;k
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    How does fabs compare to fph?

    • one year ago
  4. DLBlast
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://recent-science.com/index.php/rrst/article/viewfile/14865/7567

    • one year ago
  5. DLBlast
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats the hole model

    • one year ago
  6. lklkl;k;lk;k
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that's a research paper, not sure if it will help me with my hw

    • one year ago
  7. DLBlast
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If the frequency of the incoming light is great enough, there should be enough energy to break off the electron and have some left over to give it some kinetic energy. So… h f = Ek max + W

    • one year ago
  8. DLBlast
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    W = work function (J or eV) h = Planck’s constant fo = threshold frequency (Hz)

    • one year ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.