Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

zhengcl86

  • 3 years ago

determine the domain of \[f(x)=\sqrt{9-x ^{2}}\]

  • This Question is Closed
  1. henryrodriguez713
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    What's your question? haha

  2. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    determine the domain \[f(x)=\sqrt{9-x ^{2}}\]

  3. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you know what the question is asking for? i.e. do you know what the domain of a function is?

  4. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the question just says determine the domain of \[f(x)=\sqrt{9-x ^{2}}\]

  5. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Yes I know. But do YOU know what it means? What is the "domain"

  6. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh lol isnt it a set of functions with all possible inputs from neg to pos or infinite?

  7. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wouldn't i be breaking down the square root of 9 - x squared (3-x)(3+x)

  8. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    It is all the values of x that you could put into your function to get an output value. So a better question would be to ask yourself what values of x can I put into the function that makes it DNE

  9. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what does DNE mean?

  10. henryrodriguez713
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1358900569521:dw||dw:1358900892255:dw|

  11. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    DNE is 'does not exist' i.e refers to a part on the functions graph that cannot be determined, because it simply does not exist. :) Basically you need to watch out for square roots, logarithms and denominators equalling zero. In your case, you have a square root, and as @henryrodriguez713 pointed out, you CANNOT have a negative number under the square root.

  12. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1358901287263:dw|

  13. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    To get rid of the square root, simply square both sides of the equation.

  14. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    oh since i can't have a negative number, the answer would be false correct? its been 3 years since i've been in school xD

  15. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    The function does not exist for x values less than -3 and more than 3

  16. baldymcgee6
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    |dw:1358901513506:dw|

  17. henryrodriguez713
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Haha. Don't worry if you haven't been in school for three years. All that really matters is that you're learning it. :D

  18. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    |dw:1358901727152:dw|

  19. zhengcl86
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    would this be the final product answer?

  20. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy