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Anyaanya

A bunch of educators got together to write a "bill of rights" for online learners. https://github.com/audreywatters/learnersrights/blob/master/bill_of_rights.md These include the rights to access, privacy, openness, "pedagogical transparency" (to understand the ways you are being taught), "financial transparency" (where is my tuition money going?), to have great teachers, and to become teachers. The problem is, they didn't ask any learners what they wanted. You are learning online right now. What rights do you want?

  • one year ago
  • one year ago

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  1. KonradZuse
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    Personally, as someone who has been very upset with the lack of education I have received in school, as well as a recent graduate here are my few cents. 1. Education is important for everyone. It doesn't matter what you want to do, you deserve education BASED ON WHAT YOU WANT TO DO IN LIFE. Since we have Connexus, Connections Academy, ETC we can now apply these to students. I have always been interested in computers since before I could do anything else. I've wanted computer classes for SO SO Long, and I took my first "comp sci" class when I was 17, which was a joke. College courses were also jokish. So that brings me to my next topic. I know kids who are STILL trying to figure out what they want to do AFTER college. Half of trhe kids will change majors 5 times, some wont pick a major and be stuck with "Liberal Arts" and some will do something they HATE. THIS IS NOT GOOD. 2. Teach kids real world problems, and have them enjoy it. When I was in school a lot of it was boring, and a lot of it didn't really make me want to learn. If students are given an environment they want to learn, they will want to learn. Making it fun, and being hands on is important. Instead of teaching them computer theory like I learned, show them how to make a cool game or something. Now how exactly did I learn? I went to google, and checked out Oracle's trail for computer programming. I read up, looked at THEIR EXAMPLES/EXERCISES and learned A TON! They set it up so so well, and it makes you really want to learn. I also joined forums like the coderanch, and Open Study... 3. Don't be biased in teaching. Honestly I see this SOOO MUCH. Politics, and other crap make it to the classroom. It's all good to have your own opinion, but don't force it on others. I see this a lot, but not too sure how it will go for an online environment. 4. Teachers/professors who care. In my time I have met a lot of wonderful professors, mentors, teachers, coaches, and a ton of HORRIBLE ones. The teachers are what brings the class, as well as the material together. Without that you will be SOL wirthout Open Study or another place to guide you. The teacher is there for a reason. So really to sum up everything to be a "perfect" there needs to be education based on what the students want(this is a huge step in a good direction from normal public schools). If we teach kids WHAT THEY WANT TO LEARN and help them ACHIEVE IT, everything will go so much better. Combining that with amazing teachers, and examples that kids will learn and love, we can create a generation of happy students. Everything can be fixed, and I believe online institutions can really create a HUGE impact.

    • one year ago
  2. Anyaanya
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    Thanks @KonradZuse ! Can i ask what your educational background is?

    • one year ago
  3. KonradZuse
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    As in major or...? I am a Computer Science major which is my main profession, but I am also certified as a lifeguard, personal trainer, and ski instructor which I took classes as well.

    • one year ago
  4. KonradZuse
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    The trainer courses were very very good, but it seems like a lot of schools are lacking in their actual education. It's really sad. The job market sucks, and with students being taught the same thing, and not really learning what they wish it's hard to distinguish someone from the rest of the pack. If we want to succeed we need to produce students who enjoy learning, and have the tools THEY WANT TO LEARN. I have gotten into arguments, especially with English teachers, about why I need to take 12 years of English.... I am a computer scientist, my language i computers, NOT ENGLISH(of course I have to type and write and such, but that is basic stuff). They had us learning how to analyze POETRY. SERIOUSLY LOL..... This was college as well. When I pay for an education I want to learn what I want to learn, not take 60 credits of GED(General Education) [what they called required courses at my school] and half computer courses. I want 100% computer courses, as I've already learned history, math, science, etc previously. Of course I should learn more math because it is needed, but everything is give or take depending on the situation. Why do I need history? English? I even took a speech class... REALLY? If I'm a history teacher why do I care about calculus 2, or linear algebra? They want "Well rounded" students, but these students are all the same. We are producing 2940810948102312 students EXACTLY the same, trying to get THE SAME EXACT JOB. How can one overcome the next? That is why I learned on my own. I told myself I want to distinguish myself from the pack, and I have. Being in software that I learned myself, the life-guarding, the personal training, and ski instructing are all valuable tools. That has always really been my biggest issue. I want what I want to learn, and if I do not know what I want to do, try to help me. Giving me 200 general courses aren't helping. GUIDE ME! But again I've known since I was very young what I wanted to do, I am EXTREMELY lucky... Most people are not.

    • one year ago
  5. NotTim
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    Hi, I'm NotTim. My only online learning experience was ilc.org, tutorvista trial and Openstudy. I guess, as a student, all I really want from an online education is for my questions to not be ignored, or given partial information and expected to continue on without guidance (until of course they will assist me later). Don't really got much to say.

    • one year ago
  6. nincompoop
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    Though it may be of little help to address what is being sought in the original post, I would like to share two debate videos from intelligencesquared US and Australia on education and vocation or training. And to follow,are on my thoughts on the matters raised by the user. http://intelligencesquaredus.org/debates/past-debates/item/550-too-many-kids-go-to-college-our-first-debate-in-chicago http://www.iq2oz.com/events/event-details/special-events/2012-university-degree.php The rights I want are inscribed in the constitution and there are laws in placed already. There are intellectual property rights, privacy rights, and other rights you can think of already in placed. Therefore, I think these rights just have to be extended in order to address the emerging problems that arise in our digital age. When it comes to transparencies and such, we can follow the current models that our current premier colleges and Universities implement and proceed with what we already do. Though sometimes can be vague, we see statement of purpose or mission statements overall. Addressing the issue on asking what the learners want is much like looking for a specialized or customized learning. Consumers or students must be aware and do their own research much like how we conduct before we enroll in particular school of taught. Specially when time, money and effort are involved, I think one has to be on the qui vive. The growing number of virtual schools or online classes are what we should expect as we expand the use of internet. In terms of educating people the virtual space is just another marketplace where when there is a demand, there will be a supply, and of course all the elements and intricacies that follow. And while It is true that making use of the internet have helped reach many kids that didn't have much means to get their education without it, it is also undoubtedly true that the virtual space is not immune to the same problem we face in real classroom - the plummeting quality in education. How do we address this is what we should focus on, perhaps more robustly. YES - one can be an educator by all means. I know that there are talented people who can teach better what we have in some of our classrooms. The issue is that they have not or they are not properly credentialed. What we have to remember is that there are reasons why we have several requisites in placed before one can teach in our classes. Has it in any way elevated the quality of our youngsters' education? YES and NO. But in Universities, it is mostly a yes. So to summarize my thoughts. The rights I want in the ever-growing digital era are not anything different than what I would want outside of it. We have to expand these rights to be applicable into the digital world. For current and future virtual schools, the models of premier Universities can provide good foundations in addressing the needs of students and future prospects. And students must conduct his or her own research before signing up. The plummeting quality of education is what we need to focus on though perhaps without alienating talented people who can teach but without proper credentials.

    • one year ago
  7. nincompoop
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    I know I have neglected to address the "open-course or study" question. This part of the online learning is still a bit tricky, but in business sense, I do not see it to be different than any thriving not-for-profit organizations. It is difficult to proceed without funds and every organization has to be able to come up with some ways to keep things afloat.

    • one year ago
  8. NotTim
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    Ads. And donations.

    • one year ago
  9. nincompoop
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    thanks, @NotTim really thanks for the great idea :)

    • one year ago
  10. NotTim
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    That's how wikipedia does it. And I gues that's the only way a non-for-profit organization can continue running. Unless you run specialized, pay-for-to-get-access courses or assistance.

    • one year ago
  11. NotTim
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    ...err....

    • one year ago
  12. KonradZuse
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    non-for-profit means they aren't making a profit... It would be for the payment towards site, etc... Also I don't think this has anything to do with the OP, we already have payment methods...

    • one year ago
  13. shawnf
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    I wanna rock!

    • one year ago
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