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jollysailorbold

  • 3 years ago

Could somebody explain what this sign means? (I'll draw it below.)

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  1. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    |dw:1359007073471:dw| (It has to do with inequalities, sets, and subsets)

  2. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    for example: \[A \subseteq B\]

  3. skullpatrol
    • 3 years ago
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    The set A is a subset of the set B or the same as the set B.

  4. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    discrete math indeed

  5. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    hmm, and if it's just like this? \[A \subset B\] ?

  6. skullpatrol
    • 3 years ago
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    Then the set A is a subset of the set B.

  7. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah, I see. And \[A \cup B \] ?

  8. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    union

  9. skullpatrol
    • 3 years ago
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    $$a \le b$$ compared to $$a< b$$

  10. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    def: the union of the sets a and b, denote by A U B is the st that contain those elements that are either in a or in b , or both

  11. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    Ah wait I'm still a bit confused. So if I'm asked: If A = {2, 4, 6, 8, 10} and B = {4, 8, 10}, then which of the following statements is false? 1) A ∩ B = B 2) B⊆B 3) A⊂B Then it would be 3 because A is not a subset of B, it is B that is a subset of A.. right?

  12. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    u need to prove the three staments

  13. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    No, I don't. I need to choose which one out of these (A ∩ B = B, B⊆B, and A⊂B) are false.

  14. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    (1) {2, 4, 6, 8, 10} ∩ {4, 8, 10}

  15. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    that a intersection

  16. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    I'm lost :/

  17. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    ∩=intersection ∪= union

  18. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    (1) {2, 4, 6, 8, 10} ∩ {4, 8, 10}= {4, 8, 10} true because is a intersection {2, 4, 6, 8, 10} ∪ {4, 8, 10}= {4, 8, 10} false is support to be equal to {2, 4, 6, 8, 10}

  19. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    It's not A ∩ B = B because it's an intersection, nor B⊆B because {4, 8, 10} is the same as {4, 8, 10}.. so the one that's false is what I said earlier: A⊂B...

  20. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    yes that false

  21. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    the second one is also true

  22. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    s⊆s or empty set ⊆ empty set

  23. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    Thank you for you help (even though, honestly, it was very confusing...)

  24. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    if u read the book u will understand it better

  25. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    I didn't have a book. I have online schooling where they rarely give me well written lessons. (If I could just read the book I wouldn't be using OpenStudy.)

  26. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    i don't know if this book good for you.i will give you name if wants to read it. Discretematics and its appliacation seven or six edition by kenneth H. Rosen

  27. Andresfon12
    • 3 years ago
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    have a great day

  28. jollysailorbold
    • 3 years ago
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    Oh okay thank you! And you too!

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